Scoreboard roundup — 7/21/18

first_imgJuly 22, 2018 /Sports News – National Scoreboard roundup — 7/21/18 Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailiStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Here are the scores from Saturday’s sports events:INTERLEAGUEN.Y. Yankees 7, N.Y. Mets 6Miami 3, Tampa Bay 2Oakland 4, San Francisco 3, 11 InningsAMERICAN LEAGUEToronto 4, Baltimore 1Detroit 5, Boston 0Kansas City, 4 Minnesota 2Houston 7, L.A. Angels 0Cleveland 16, Texas 3Chicago White Sox 5, Seattle 0NATIONAL LEAGUEChicago Cubs 7, St. Louis 2Milwaukee 4, L.A. Dodgers 2Pittsburgh 6, Cincinnati 2St. Louis 6, Chicago Cubs 3Colorado 6, Arizona 5Atlanta at Washington 7:05 p.m., postponedSan Diego at Philadelphia 7:05 p.m., postponedWOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATIONWashington 95, N.Y. Liberty 78Minnesota 80, Phoenix 75Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.center_img Beau Lundlast_img read more

High Housing Costs Driving Population Shifts

first_imgBy Tim HendersonA view of Manhattan from New York’s Brooklyn Bridge Park. Brooklyn is one of the places where population growth has slowed, as more affordable areas in the Sun Belt are growing.Fewer people are moving into some of the country’s most expensive areas, including San Diego, Silicon Valley, and some Washington, D.C., suburbs. At the same time, places where the cost of living is lower, such as Las Vegas, Phoenix and parts of Florida, are showing bigger population gains, new census data show.A likely explanation: the cost of housing, which can eat up 30 to 50 percent of a household’s income. It’s the biggest factor for millennials planning a move. It’s also a key factor for retirees looking to downsize. And it helps explain population growth in the Sun Belt, where it’s often less expensive to live.“Available and affordable housing may be the new piece in the continued gains in Sun Belt counties,” said William Frey, a demographer at the Brookings Institution. “The housing market is motivating some of the growth in Nevada, as well as Florida, and maybe for Arizona, too.”Arizona’s Maricopa County, home to Phoenix, saw its largest population increase of the decade in 2015, adding 78,000 residents, according to new county population estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau.Slowing GrowthFor years, cities like Los Angeles and San Diego, as well as Brooklyn, New York, and some Washington, D.C., suburban counties, have enjoyed tremendous growth despite their relatively high costs of living. Silicon Valley has been growing quickly, too.But their allure may be fading.In Santa Clara County, the heart of Silicon Valley, where the median home price is $950,000, the highest in the nation, there were 22,000 new residents in 2015. That’s down from 25,000 in 2014 and the lowest number since 2006.And in Brooklyn (Kings County), which has changed from downscale to upscale and pricy in recent years, the population grew by 16,000 in 2015 — 5,000 less than the year before and the smallest increase of the past decade. The borough gained 34,000 people in 2011.Ronald Flores, a sociology professor at Connecticut College, said New York City has changed since the 1970s, when he was growing up in the South Bronx. Affluent people used to flee the city, he said; now they want to be there — and are driving out the poor.“Now, it’s more a concentration of wealth in the city where before it was a concentration of poverty,” Flores said.New Hot SpotsSeveral parts of the country where the cost of living is more affordable have enjoyed strong growth in the past year.In Clark County, Nevada, which includes Las Vegas, population grew by 46,000 last year, up by 5,000 from the previous year and the largest increase since 2007. Utah County, Utah, which includes Provo, gained 14,000, an increase of 5,000, the largest since 2009.Florida dominates the list of counties where growth accelerated last year: Brevard County, which includes Cocoa Beach and Cape Canaveral, saw population growth double, adding 11,000 people, the biggest increase in 11 years. And Hillsborough County, which includes Tampa, grew by 31,000, an increase of 6,000 over the previous year and its strongest growth since 2011. In all, 20 counties in Florida added at least 1,000 more people last year than they did the year before.Many of the people who moved were prompted by cost-consciousness, said Julie Harrington, director of the Center for Economic Forecasting and Analysis at Florida State University. Especially around Tampa, in Hillsborough County, and Fort Myers, in Lee County, where housing is less expensive than in nearby areas, Harrington said.But the availability of jobs is also a big factor in the growth or decline of an area’s population.Renewed job growth in the aerospace industry may be drawing some new residents around Cocoa Beach and Daytona Beach, said Richard Doty, a demographer with the Bureau of Economic and Business Research at the University of Florida.Brevard County, home to Cocoa Beach, fell on hard times when the space shuttle program ended in 2011, costing the region thousands of jobs. But Blue Origin, founded by Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, announced plans last year to hire 330 people as part of its private space travel business. Boeing has also expanded aerospace operations in the area.Areas around Tampa are more retirement-oriented, Doty said, although they also have new jobs for young people: a new Amazon warehouse hired a thousand people last year and plans to expand. “Southwest Florida was particularly hard-hit during the recession, so it’s really nice to see it coming back,” Doty said.Moving with Housing Costs in MindWhile many factors, such as jobs, go into a decision to move, young people think of price first, according to a survey of millennials released last year by the Urban Land Institute.“In considering a future residential community, cost of housing is the most important factor,” said Stockton Williams, director of the institute’s Terwilliger Center for Housing.The cost of housing has become an increasingly urgent issue for many, as record numbers of people spend too much on housing, forcing them to cut back on health care and other critical expenses, according to a study released last year by the Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies.Empty nesters, another large component of the population, are also moving with lower costs in mind as retirement approaches.Richard Albury, a 54-year-old software developer whose oldest child is now in high school, is planning a move from the Virginia suburbs of Washington, D.C., to Cocoa Beach, where a typical home costs $160,500. He now works from home for a New Jersey-based company so he can live anywhere.“Housing costs are certainly a factor. The D.C. area is extremely expensive,” Albury said, adding that he’s been shopping and thinks he can find a large house with a pool near Cocoa Beach for about $320,000, half the price of a similar house in the Virginia suburbs.Moving can make sense for renters, too.San Francisco, Oakland and San Jose have the highest median rents in the nation, at more than $3,000 for a three-bedroom, according to current U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development estimates. The median rent for a three-bedroom in Cocoa Beach is less than $1,300.Early Signs of Price PressureWhile relatively low housing prices may be drawing new residents to the Sun Belt, there are signs that increased demand may already be pushing prices higher.In Brevard County, Florida, home prices rose 13 percent between mid-2014 and mid-2015, according to the Federal Housing Finance Agency’s home price index. (Median prices are based on preliminary 2015 values from the National Association of Realtors.) And they rose 10 percent in the Las Vegas area, where the median price is $216,800.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

City Council Meeting Agenda For 4-10-17

first_imgCITY OF EVANSVILLE CITY COUNCIL Agenda Ward: Committee: Owner: Ward: VI. CONSENT AGENDA: SECOND READING OF ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS An Ordinance to Rezone Certain Real Estate in the City of Evansville, State of Indiana, More Commonly Known as 3800 N. Burkhardt RoadRoberts InvestmentHoldings, LLC 5:25 p.m. An Ordinance Amending the Evansville Zoning Code AdamsRon London, APCAn Ordinance of the Common Council of the City of Evansville Authorizing Transfers of Appropriations, Additional Appropriations and Repeal and Re-Appropriation of Funds for Various City Funds McGinnRuss Lloyd, Jr., City ControllerA Resolution of the Common Council of the City of Evansville Confirming the Declaration of an Economic Revitilization Area for Property Tax Phase-In for the Rehabilitation of Real Property at 202 Southeast Second Street, Evansville, IN 47713; 209 Chestnut Street Evansville, IN 47713 – Kinship Hospitality, LLCMcGinnAndrea Lendy, Growth AllianceAn Ordinance to Rezone Certain Real Estate in the City of Evansville, State of Indiana, More Commonly Known as 310, 312 Harriet StreetRichard E. Mills Owner: Christopher D. Severse R4 to C4 Ward: 6 BrinkmeyerRichard E. Mills, Mills-Wallace & Assoc., Inc. Finance Chair McGinn 4/24/2017 Finance Chair McGinn 4/24/2017 ORDINANCE G-2017-06 Sponsor(s):Notify:ORDINANCE F-2017-04Sponsor(s):Notify:RESOLUTION C-2017-06Sponsor(s): Notify:ORDINANCE R-2017-07 AMENDEDPetitioner: Requested Change: Representative: A Resolution of the Common Council of the City of Evansville Confirming the Property Tax Phase-In for Redevelopment/Rehabilitation of Real Property – Eastland Station, LLC managed by Phillips Edison & Company, 1500 North Green River Rd., Evansville, INMcGinnAndrea Lendy, Growth AllianceAn Ordinance to Rezone Certain Real Estate in the City of Evansville, State of Indiana, More Commonly Known as 2026 Covert AvenueLannan – Jones, LLC Owner: Jamie M. LannanR1 to C2 Ward: 2 MosbyJamie M. LannanAn Ordinance to Rezone Certain Real Estate in the City of Evansville, State of Indiana, More Commonly Known as 22 N. Taft AvenueRon Schutz, Jr. Owner: Ron Schutz, Jr.R1 to C4 Ward: 3 Hargis Ron Schutz, Jr.An Ordinance to Rezone Certain Real Estate in the City of Evansville, State of Indiana, More Commonly Known as 1011 Mary StreetAurora, Inc. Owner: Aurora, Inc.R2 to C4 w/ UDC Ward: 3 Hargis Kahn, Dees, Donovan & Kahn, LLPAn Ordinance to Rezone Certain Real Estate in the City of Evansville, State of Indiana, More Commonly Known as 1615, 1702, 1706 Dresden StreetRellecke, LLC Owner: Rellecke, LLCR2 to M2 Ward: 6 Brinkmeyer Kahn, Dees, Donovan & Kahn, LLP 5:25 p.m. RESOLUTION C-2017-04Sponsor(s): Notify:ORDINANCE R-2016-32 AMENDEDPetitioner: Requested Change: Representative:ORDINANCE R-2017-01Petitioner: Requested Change: Representative:ORDINANCE R-2017-02Petitioner: Requested Change: Representative:ORDINANCE R-2017-03 AMENDEDPetitioner: Requested Change: Representative:IX. RESOLUTION DOCKET Committee: A.S.D. Chair Brinkmeyer 4/24/2017 VIII. REGULAR AGENDA: FINAL READING OF ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS Committee: 5:20 p.m.center_img A Resolution of the Common Council of the City of Evansville Confirming the Property Tax Phase-In for Redevelopment/Rehabilitation of Real Property – Eastland Station, LLC managed by Phillips Edison & Company, 1500 North Green River Rd., Evansville, INMcGinnAndrea Lendy, Growth AllianceAn Ordinance to Rezone Certain Real Estate in the City of Evansville, State of Indiana, More Commonly Known as 2026 Covert AvenueLannan – Jones, LLC Owner: Jamie M. LannanR1 to C2 Ward: 2 MosbyJamie M. LannanAn Ordinance to Rezone Certain Real Estate in the City of Evansville, State of Indiana, More Commonly Known as 22 N. Taft AvenueRon Schutz, Jr. Owner: Ron Schutz, Jr.R1 to C4 Ward: 3 Hargis Ron Schutz, Jr.An Ordinance to Rezone Certain Real Estate in the City of Evansville, State of Indiana, More Commonly Known as 1011 Mary StreetAurora, Inc. Owner: Aurora, Inc.R2 to C4 w/ UDC Ward: 3 Hargis Kahn, Dees, Donovan & Kahn, LLPAn Ordinance to Rezone Certain Real Estate in the City of Evansville, State of Indiana, More Commonly Known as 1615, 1702, 1706 Dresden StreetRellecke, LLC Owner: Rellecke, LLCR2 to M2 Ward: 6 Brinkmeyer Kahn, Dees, Donovan & Kahn, LLP Committee: Owner: X. MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESSTHE NEXT MEETING of the Common Council will be Monday, April 24, 2017 at 5:30p.m. Committee meetings will begin at 5:15 p.m.ADDITIONAL MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESSXI. COMMITTEE REPORTS XII. ADJOURNMENT Committee: I. INTRODUCTIONII. APPROVAL OF MEETING MEMORANDAIII. REPORTS AND COMMUNICATIONSIV. SPECIAL ORDERS OF THE DAYV. CONSENT AGENDA: FIRST READING OF ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS 5:25 p.m. RESOLUTION C-2017-04Sponsor(s): Notify:ORDINANCE R-2016-32 AMENDEDPetitioner: Requested Change: Representative:ORDINANCE R-2017-01Petitioner: Requested Change: Representative:ORDINANCE R-2017-02Petitioner: Requested Change: Representative:ORDINANCE R-2017-03 AMENDEDPetitioner: Requested Change: Representative:VII. COMMITTEE REPORTS Anthony & Mary Anne Schmitt6 Brinkmeyer R1 to C4 w/ UDC Krista B. Lockyear David Dillman, Carol Dillman, John Dillman, Matt Dillman, Margaret Straka, Sarah Pottinger, Susan Koeppel, Martha Bond, Carl Wegel, Jerol Watson, Darol Watson, Layne Watson1 McGinn ORDINANCE R-2017-08Petitioner: Requested Change: Representative:ORDINANCE R-2017-09Petitioner:Requested Change: Representative:ORDINANCE R-2017-10Petitioner: Requested Change: Representative:ORDINANCE R-2017-11 Petitioner:Requested Change: Representative: Finance Chair McGinn 4/10/2017 Finance Chair McGinn 4/10/2017 An Ordinance to Rezone Certain Real Estate in the City of Evansville, State of Indiana, More Commonly Known as 1756 N. Alvord Blvd.Louis E. & Norma J. Hartz Owner: Louis E. & Norma J. Hartz R1 to R2 Ward: 3 HargisKathryn Kornblum, Esq., VanStone & Kornblum, LLCAn Ordinance to Rezone Certain Real Estate in the City of Evansville, State of Indiana, More Commonly Known as 3130 Waterman DriveAnthony & Mary AnneSchmittR3 to R1Mary Anne SchmittAn Ordinance to Rezone Certain Real Estate in the City of Evansville, State of Indiana, More Commonly Known as 4913 Temple AvenueWeb Properties, LLC Owner: Web Properties, LLC R1 to C4 w/ UDC Ward: 5 ElpersAshley Hollen, Esq., Kahn, Deese, Donovan & Kahn, LLP 5:15 p.m. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Hell introduces gluten-free pizza to the UK

first_imgHell Pizza, has launched gluten-free pizza bases in the UK, following their success in New Zealand. The launch of the bases coincided with Coeliac UK’s ’Food Without Fear’ week. In the UK, around one in 100 people suffer from coeliac disease, caused by gluten intolerance.The bases will also be accompanied by a range of carefully selected toppings. “We first found out about coeliac disease when one of our staff mentioned he couldn’t eat pizza, which is unheard of at Hell,” said Callum Davies, owner and founder of Hell Pizza. Hell then decided to create a base for the 40,000 Kiwis with coeliac disease, finding a well-respected supplier and introducing the concept to their restaurants.Hell Pizza started out in New Zealand in 1996. After building up a large customer base, it sold the New Zealand master franchise rights to Burger King, and opened its first UK restaurant in Fulham, London in 2007.[http://www.hellpizza.co.uk]last_img read more

Sunset for organics?

first_imgHow do we solve a problem like organics? Once the hills were alive with the sound of ringing cash tills, as the organic market continued its decade-long steady growth. But the organic idyll was recently upset by an ominous rumbling in the form of new data, which showed that the organics market suffered the first year-on-year downturn in sales this year in April (source TNS Global).Alarm bells started ringing at BB when one of the Soil Assoc-iation’s own ’Organic Heroes’, the three-year-old Organic Cake Company – an artisan bakery supplying London and the south-east – went under, citing market pressures. “I stopped baking over a year ago and the whole venture cost me dear. I simply could not compete with the big bakeries,” said baker Paul Kirby from the company.But organics is facing a greater threat than rising costs – its identity. Luke Vincent, client director for Dragon Brands, said that organics faces an identity crisis. The concept has seen itself overtaken in the ’ethical products’ marketplace by Fairtrade and locally sourced. Having ’organic’ as a USP is no longer enough, especially as, he thinks, organics may be vulnerable to recession. “We need to see a shift in positioning,” he said.The proof appears in Mintel research, which shows that 25% of all UK food launches are now labelled additive-free, compared with 9% labelled as organic.While consumers may have an implicit understanding that ’or-ganic’ means ’no chemicals’, additive-free labelling detracts from the organic message. “Or-ganic needs to compete with everything else that’s out there,” continued Vincent. Fairtrade’s humanistic message has further muddied the waters. “They are better at articulating a story that’s relevant to consumers,” he added. “Fairtrade and ’local’ both have a human face, but organic doesn’t. There is an awful lot to be learned in the way ’local’ is communicated in organic.”But Peter Melchett, chair of the Soil Association, insisted organic is not the poor relation. “Organic is not being drowned out – we’re still seeing healthy growth in the organic market. ’Local’ has gained in importance, but the fact that consumers are interested in other things apart from organic, shouldn’t really bother us,” he told BB.Organic producers say their ethical credentials are more rigorous than Fairtrade products, which only require 20% of one ’significant’ ingredient (dry weight) to be Fairtrade in order to carry the logo. But ’local’ is more of a sticking point.A lack of home-grown organic wheat of breadmaking quality in the UK means that over two-thirds of it has to be imported. Consumer research from Mintel shows that those who purchase a wide range of organic products are also most interested in locally-sourced products. The focus on local has the perverse effect of discouraging farmers from putting their land under organic conversion, thus restricting the growth in organic food, said Mintel director David Jago. As conventional grain prices have rocketed, cereal farmers are getting much better prices than they’d expected.While prices rise, half the people surveyed recently by IGD said expense was the biggest barrier to ethical shopping – a 10% price hike for organic products was cited as acceptable. But a price check last week showed an 800g Hovis square, thick, white loaf at 92p in Tesco, with Hovis’s 800g white organic bread at £1.30 – nearly 30% more.Forecasters at the Ernst & Young ITEM club last month reported that customers might stop coughing up 50% premiums for organic, with Joel Segal, head of consumer products, suggesting higher-end consumers are facing a trade off – either sticking to their principles, or living without Fairtrade or organic food to avoid having to cut back elsewhere.While some organic bakers are finding it hard to justify rising prices, Melchett finds a positive angle, saying, “Non-organic wheat prices off the farm have tripled, while organic have only doubled – so relatively speaking, organic bread has become slightly cheaper by comparison.”Room for optimismBut is the sun really setting on organics? One intriguing scenario predicts organics actually getting cheaper over the next 12-18 months. As soaring oil prices continue to drive up energy-intensive fertiliser costs, this may persuade farmers to switch to organic, which uses 26% less energy per kilogram of food. “That could happen this year or next, and that’s a very new way of thinking, because until now, people have thought conventional grain is cheaper,” said Tom Russell, marketing manager for Shipton Mill. “Suddenly, that’s not going to be the case and we may see people switching to organic because the commercial model has changed.”Later this year, a three-year trial conducted by CCFRA and Newcastle University will an-nounce findings that should help farmers produce better protein home-grown organic wheats with greater yields – research areas that have been neglected for 60 years. Some of the supply chain issues that have dogged the organic movement will be addressed by the Organic Trade Board, formed last month with a brief to develop the organic supplier network. And, of course, a good harvest worldwide would be nice for driving down prices.That leaves the issue of identity: how do we make it clearer in consumers’ minds what they’re paying for when they buy an organic bakery product?”The question is, how long will people pay the premium for what is essentially a staple product?” asked Russell. “We believe they will continue to, but may look to buy from a local baker making traditional breads, with whom they have a relationship.”There is potential for significant growth in more traditionally baked bread, despite there being little nutritional research in that particular area, added Melchett: “The potential for the significant health benefits in quality bread is exciting for the industry,” he said. Similarly, the huge growth in organic box schemes remains untapped in bakery.Meanwhile, Joe Reade of Is-land Bakery Organics remains confident that organics will continue to grow as a marker of sustainable food with integrity and taste – as long as the marketing keeps pace with world developments.”[The economy] has undoubtedly had an effect on sales, but how enduring this will be, only time will tell,” he said. “It’s true that the organic consumer is used to slightly higher prices, but they are not more immune to the economic climate.”Organic standards will have to evolve and be properly communicated to the consumer, so that the organic ’brand’ is a clear marker, showing that what they are buying is not only sustainably grown, but also low-carbon, responsibly manufactured, and of high quality.”—-=== Nuts! Organics drops to the bottom of the list of consumer ethical issue s ===A recent survey of 1,500 women cited ’caring about the environment’ as the number one personality trait women find attractive in men. This, we think, is a pretty definitive snapshot of ethical attitudes today, especially given that the online poll was conducted by men’s boob mag, Nuts. However, you might prefer to cite the following data, from IGD Consumer Unit, in your Powerpoint presentations. It shows organics struggling to hold its own in an increasingly crowded ethical marketplace.Q: Which of these are you interested in?Animal Welfare (free range/not tested on animals) 69%Local/British 55%Environmentally friendly 53%Fairly traded 48%Organic products 32%Source: IGD, March 2008Consumers consider Fairtrade labels much more important than organic, states Mintel’s Food Labelling report (Jan 2008). More products have been launched organic than Fairtrade. “Even so, the fact that 16% of consumers have never even seen the organic logo, compared to only 6% for Fairtrade, is striking given all the media attention that organic receives,” it said.last_img read more

Take a seat … and the city’s pulse

first_imgAs visitors to the Graduate School of Design’s (GSD) Gund Hall approach the puzzling blanket of concrete installed by the Quincy Street entrance this semester, the mound — or is it a bench? — buzzes and throbs.Titled “PULSUS,” the enigmatic piece is described by its designer as a form of “perceptual artificial intelligence.” It gathers real-time data on city activity, such as traffic patterns and what residents are doing and feeling, from various sources and translates the information into soundscapes.Allen Sayegh, associate professor in practice of architectural technology, spoke with the GSD about his installation and what it might signal in a world increasingly invested in artificial intelligence.The installation outside Gund Hall responds to real-time data, ranging from emojis used on social media to police radio dispatches.GSD: From the visitor’s perspective, you see this structure and you sense that it’s communicating in some way, or at least buzzing and pulsing. Where are these signals coming from?SAYEGH: “PULSUS” gathers data from different sources — real-time police conversations, tweets from around the community, among others — and then translates these into different types of tonal sounds, producing the buzzing that you can hear and feel when you’re close to it. When we had it in SoHo in New York over the summer, it also sent out bursts of mist to cool off visitors.To create these effects, we’re drawing from different types of tweets that are geo-tagged around the city. We’re looking at language, especially the emojis that are being used, which we quantify with different values, which then are coded to produce sounds.We wanted to generate an experience that resonates on an emotional ground level. The process has been very much a blend between analyzing quantitative data and designing an experience. And at the end, the resulting piece acts essentially as a conch shell for urban activity, or as a stethoscope: a new way to listen in to the city’s activity, and a concrete interface with a feedback system that is almost like a musical instrument. There are different metaphors people have been using to describe it, but the idea is to sense the pulse of the city. “All of the curves and undulations in ‘PULSUS’ are literal translations of the human body.”The installation becomes a gathering spot.GSD: What fueled the idea of taking real-time urban data and translating it into a very physical, sensory experience like this?SAYEGH: Today, there are all sorts of conversations about data, big data, artificial intelligence, machine learning, and how data and cities are merging and becoming reliant on each other. With “PULSUS,” I wanted to go with something more playful, like the idea of putting an ear on the city and simply listening to its pulse.GSD: Looking at the physical object, “PULSUS” has different curves and undulations carved into its concrete form. What is the shape of these curves, and the overall project, meant to signify?SAYEGH: Referring back to the concept of human scale, all of the curves and undulations in “PULSUS” are literal translations of the human body. There are positive and negative imprints of seven human bodies. It almost looks like a concrete blanket draped over somebody. So that’s part of the physical element here, how we worked with the idea of the physical form with the intention of evoking considerations on the human scale and human body. It encourages you to feel and think very literally about the human body and scale while the energy and rhythm of an entire city is pulsing beside you.GSD: In a sense “PULSUS” is like a new sort of map. We’re so used to seeing data, especially about regions or a city, being represented visually but two-dimensionally, in a map or an atlas. Would you in any way compare “PULSUS” to a map?SAYEGH: Yes and no. On one level it is a representation, but it’s more than just a visual reference. It’s a performance, something you sense and feel with the body.“The piece acts essentially as a conch shell for urban activity, or as a stethoscope: a new way to listen in to the city’s activity.”“Concrete is very versatile. It’s very durable yet very malleable.”A closer view of the sculpture’s detail.GSD: When you look at the actual, physical installation, it’s made out of concrete, which can represent many things in this context: the idea of the “concrete jungle,” cities and buildings made out of concrete, concrete plans, concrete ideas; you mentioned earlier the idea of a musical instrument with a concrete interface. What was the design process like from conception to production, and why concrete?SAYEGH: We were thinking, first, of the city and its concrete. Concrete is very versatile. It’s very durable yet very malleable. The sound qualities of concrete are very rich. So as a material it has a lot of interesting qualities. Part of the challenge of this hybrid sculpture or bench was to really push the limits of what we can do with the material physically and as well at the intersection of the physical and the digital, which is where “PULSUS” falls. And from there, we experimented with how we can add data interpretation to this intersectional space.GSD: The term “artificial intelligence” gets discussed a lot, and you noted it earlier; in a way, “PULSUS” feels to me like an example of artificial intelligence. It’s a non-human organism taking information and translating it and communicating it in its own language; it’s been taught or trained to communicate. Do you in any way see “PULSUS” as an expression of artificial intelligence, or AI?SAYEGH: Actually I do. It’s a form of perceptual artificial intelligence. It makes you think that it has its own way of understanding and communicating though its actions based on a wide range of data sources. In this process, we are mining multiple large sources of data in various forms — numbers, text, emojis, audio feeds — looking at different criteria we have to work with, and designing the experience based on how the data can be interpreted. In the end, it hums and vibrates and responds to vibrations around it, all the while quietly collecting and processing what’s going on in the city. So yes, it’s perceptual AI in manifest.GSD: What are some of the general reactions you’ve had to “PULSUS” so far?SAYEGH: In a funny way it feels like some sort of a Rorschach test. People usually tend to project their current socio-political take on different issues. I’ve heard everything from references to climate change to molten political sculptures. When you put in front of someone an object that does not fit into a specific mold, it tends to bring up all sorts of interesting interpretations. So then they experience it, they hear it, they feel it, and they end up spending a bit of time with it, which was the intention of the piece: an invitation to an experientially meditative moment.“When you put in front of someone an object that does not fit into a specific mold, it tends to bring up all sorts of interesting interpretations.”This interview has been edited for clarity and length. <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ny9wkkhFOGs” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/ny9wkkhFOGs/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a>last_img read more

Past SMC president dies at 89

first_imgFormer president of Saint Mary’s College Dr. Edward L. Henry died Sept. 30. He was 89. Henry was the first male lay president to lead at Saint Mary’s, serving from 1972-74. He took the position after an attempted merger between Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame fell through, and the future of the Saint Mary’s looked uncertain, according to a 1972 South Bend Tribune article. When Henry took over at Saint Mary’s, the College was set to lose over $600,000 because of the failed merger, the article said. “Dr. Edward L. Henry, Saint Mary’s new president, is counting on unprecedented student recruitment, fund drives, plus a nudge from Women’s Lib to pump life back into the faltering campus,” the article said. During that time, Notre Dame also began admitting women, which hurt Saint Mary’s enrollment. An edition of Michiana — a weekly magazine that was distributed in South Bend at the time — said when Henry stepped down in 1974, Saint Mary’s enrollment was up by 150 percent since he entered office. “The scholastic average at Saint Mary’s is above the level prevailing before the merger attempt even though the school has lost some of the very top girl students to Notre Dame,” the Michiana article said. Henry resigned from his position as president in January of 1974. “My timetable for those areas over which I could exercise influence is running ahead of itself. My commitments to the College, I feel, have been more than fulfilled,” Henry said in a 1974 press release from the College. Before coming to Saint Mary’s, Henry served as mayor of St. Cloud, Minn. from 1964 to 1971, professor and vice president at St. John’s University and president of St. Michael’s College, Marian College and Wisconsin and Belmont Abbey. Henry was born in 1921 in St. Cloud, Minn. He graduated from Saint John’s University and went to graduate school at Harvard University and the University of Chicago. Henry also served as a naval officer during World War II. Saint Mary’s current president, Carol Ann Mooney, expressed her regret over Henry’s passing in a press release. “Ed Henry became president of Saint Mary’s at a pivotal time in our history,” Mooney said. “We are grateful for his strong leadership and send our condolences to his family.”last_img read more

Ben Platt & Alana Arenas Win Clarence Derwent Awards

first_img Ben Platt Dear Evan Hansen star Ben Platt and Head of Passes’ Alana Arenas have received Actors’ Equity Foundation’s 2016 Clarence Derwent Award for most promising performers. Additionally, Lois Smith, who appeared off-Broadway this season’s Marjorie Prime and John, and The Crucible Tony nominee Bill Camp are the recipients of this year’s Richard Seff Award, which honors veteran actors in supporting roles.Platt has earned Drama League and Outer Critics Circle Award nominations for his performance in Dear Evan Hansen, now at Second Stage Theatre. He made his Broadway debut in 2014 in The Book of Mormon, having previously played the role of Elder Cunningham in Chicago and on tour. His film credits include Pitch Perfect and Ricki and the Flash.Arenas won this year’s Lucille Lortel Award for her featured performance in the Public’s Head of Passes. Her other off-Broadway credits include The Bluest Eye and Disgraced. She has been a member of Chicago’s Steppenwolf Theatre Company ensemble since 2007.Smith received a special citation this week by the New York Drama Critics’ Circle Awards, and also received Drama League and Lucille Lortel Award nominations. Her numerous stage credits include Tony-nominated performances in Buried Child and The Grapes of Wrath, as well as Stages and The Iceman Cometh.In addition to a Tony nomination, Camp picked up a Drama Desk nod for his current performance in The Crucible at the Walter Kerr Theatre. He has appeared on Broadway in Death of a Salesman, Coram Boy, Heartbreak House, Jackie, Saint Joan and The Seagull.The four recipients will be presented with the award on May 31 at Equity’s Eastern Regional Board meeting. Bill Camp Star Filescenter_img View Comments Ben Platt in ‘Dear Evan Hansen’ & Alana Arenas in ‘Head of Passes'(Photos: Matthew Murphy & Joan Marcus)last_img read more

Cantero joins the Supreme Court

first_imgCantero joins the Supreme Court August 1, 2002 Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Regular News Cantero joins the Supreme Court Senior EditorMiami appellate attorney Raoul G. Cantero III has been named to the Florida Supreme Court by Gov. Jeb Bush to replace Justice Major Harding, who retires August 31.And while he said no “litmus test” questions were asked of Cantero or any of the other four finalists for the post, Bush used the press conference, held on the west side of the Capitol with the Supreme Court in the background, to question what he called an activist judiciary.While he did not mention the Florida Supreme Court by name in his prepared remarks, in responding to reporters’ questions Bush did say he thinks Florida’s top court has overstepped its bounds in some cases.In introducing Cantero, who was born to Cuban parents in Spain and who moved to Miami at the age of nine months, Bush noted he becomes the first Hispanic named to the Supreme Court and touted his reputation as “one of the finest appellate advocates in the state.”“I greatly admire and respect this governor and what he has done for this state,” Cantero said.“And I respect Justice Harding and what he has done. I don’t think I can ever replace him, and I certainly don’t look good in a bow tie,” he added with a smile, referring the Harding’s sartorial trademark.Cantero was asked about his ability to separate court business from his personal views, particularly on abortion, because 13 years ago he wrote a letter to the editor opposing the practice.“My personal view on any particular issue will not keep me from applying the law,” he replied.Although he criticized judicial activism, Bush emphasized that his interviews of Cantero and the other finalists did not deal with any specific issue or pending cases but revolved around qualifications.“If personal views dictate how they [judges] rule, that’s troubling,” Bush said. “My belief is the judiciary should show restraint.”He said he was also pleased to appoint the first Hispanic to the Supreme Court and that it continued his practice of appointing people of diverse backgrounds to the bench and other state posts.“The significance of this appointing is not that Raoul will in some sense represent the views of Hispanics on the court,” the governor said, adding there is no such thing as one Hispanic view. “That is not the role of a judge. Raoul’s achievement is important because it proves that service on our state’s highest court is open to men and women of excellence from all backgrounds.”After the press conference, while reporters were still questioning Bush as he walked back into the Capitol, Cantero, his wife Ana Maria, sons Christian, 12, and Michael, 9, and daughter Elisa, 7, walked across the street to the Supreme Court, where they were received with hugs by Chief Justice Harry Lee Anstead.As this News went to press, his investiture ceremony had not been scheduled, according to court spokesman Craig Waters. He added those events usually take a couple of months to set up.While saying that issues did not play a part in his choice, Bush did say, “This is a chance for me to make an impact on the state,” and he noted if retained by voters, Cantero could serve almost 30 years on the bench.And in his introductory remarks, Bush said courts must protect freedoms, but also show restraint and they must respect the other branches of government. He praised the recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling upholding school vouchers, including to religious schools, and criticized the now-famous Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruling on the Pledge of Allegiance, and said those were examples that illustrated good and poor judicial restraint.“The courts can make decisions that endanger the institutions and customs that hold us together,” the governor said of the Pledge of Allegiance case. “Increasingly, courts have seized control over policy decisions that are not theirs to make.. . . “I do not know of any Floridians or Americans who have consented to government by judiciary.”When questioned by reporters later, Bush conceded “there are not bright lines that separate” the duties of the various branches of government. But he specifically included the Florida Supreme Court in his comments, saying, “There is a sense this Supreme Court does not adhere to judicial restraint.”As an example, he cited the Armstrong case where the court, in a 4-3 ruling, struck down a constitutional amendment on the death penalty that had been approved by voters almost two years earlier. The court majority said the legislatively approved ballot summary language was misleading.Although he criticized the court as a whole, Bush opened his prepared comments with praise for Harding, who has served on the court since 1990 and as a judge since 1968.“Justice Harding is a particularly beloved figured and he will be hard to replace,” the governor said.He also praised the qualifications of the other finalists — First Circuit Judge Kenneth Bell, Second District Court of Appeal Judge Chris Altenbernd, and First DCA Judges Philip Padovano and Peter Webster — chosen with Cantero by the Supreme Court Judicial Nominating Commission.last_img read more

For the first time, Pula Airport welcomes 500 passengers

first_imgPula Airport this year, for its fiftieth anniversary, really has reason to celebrate.After a record May, June, July and August in terms of the number of passengers, as well as in terms of the number of air operations, a successful series of record numbers continues in September. Thus, on September 12, 2017, Pula Airport welcomes 500 thousand passengers, who have not been at Pula Airport since Croatian independence, and the record number of passengers from last year was dropped on August 26, when Puča Airport welcomed over 436.121 passengers. “So far, the total traffic from January to August has increased by 31% compared to last year, noting that we were closed to traffic for almost two months due to the change of the runway. We are extremely proud of the fact that and airlines, even under increased peak load, recognize our work and professionalism and our relationship with business partners and passengers, which maintains the constant of a serious, safe and exceptional airport. ” points out Anđela Monas, from Pula Airport.The arrival of 500 passengers at Pula Airport will be marked with prepared prizes for half a million passengers in order to further highlight this exceptional and important event for the entire Istrian economy.Records are here to be broken, a popular proverb is known, and it is great to achieve growth in any segment, including air transport, because transport connections are the first prerequisite for long-term development. But what worries in this year’s positive “madness” for records is how many destinations take all this growth seriously, because only with strategic development and planning can we talk about sustainable, quality and long-term development of tourism.Let’s start in order, from parking, accommodation, the entire city infrastructure, beaches, signalization, etc.… because with all this growth, investments in the entire infrastructure and tourist offer must grow. Sustainable tourism is the only long-term right path.last_img read more