Bogdanovic’s 28 leads Jazz past injury-depleted Cavaliers

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailCLEVELAND (AP) — Bojan Bogdanovic scored 28 points, Rudy Gobert added 20 and the Utah Jazz began a four-game trip with a 126-113 win over the short-handed Cavaliers.Cleveland dressed only nine players because of injuries and used just seven.Donovan Mitchell added 17 points for the Jazz. Utah was flat for long stretches against Cleveland’s depleted roster. The Jazz didn’t put the Cavs away until midway through the final quarter, when Bogdanovic hit a pair of 3-pointers.Collin Sexton scored a career-high 32 points for the Cavs. Tags: Bojan Bogdanovich/NBA/Utah Jazz March 2, 2020 /Sports News – Local Bogdanovic’s 28 leads Jazz past injury-depleted Cavaliers Written by Associated Presslast_img read more

Fighting Prejudice and Discrimination: One State Leader

first_imgFighting Prejudice and Discrimination: One State Leaderwritten by Gail Riecken, City-County Observer Statehouse Editor State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Dr. Jennifer McCormick held a press event recently to talk about her plans for 2019. She made surprising announcements, one which made the headlines.Noting the trauma LGBTQ students can face in school, including being rejected by a school, McCormick said she cares for her students and wants to help them. She announced this regarding school voucher awards ( theStatehousefile, Oct 2):“This is one that we feel is very important,” McCormick said. “We don’t think any school that takes public dollars should be excluding any of our kids.”What a groundbreaking statement from her in her position; I am disappointed she isn’t running again. Her elected position’s support for LGBTQ students could help improve the school environment for LGBTQ students throughout Indiana, even when there is no prejudice against LGBTQ students attending a certain school, which brings up EVSC.I don’t know what the circumstances are in our EVSC school environment, but Wally Paynter does. He gave an impassioned speech at an NAACP press event this August.Paynter said he had been repeatedly denied an audience with the EVSC Superintendent to discuss LGBTQ issues. He praised school principals, who were trying to support LGBTQ students, and as he said wanted support from their Superintendent.Although Paynter’s plea was a small part of the NAACP press event, as with McCormick’s announcement about LGBTQ students in her 2019 plans, the topic of discrimination and prejudice reminded me of where our country was when the Fair Housing Act was passed in 1968. There was a great deal of unrest in our country at that time.Although we are certainly not at the place we were in the sixties, we should have learned something about the extreme cost to society of discrimination and denial of cultural problems by our leadership when we don’t do something positive to address them.You know I am including the country’s divisiveness over the present Supreme Court appointment. At least President Lyndon B. Johnson had the right attitude back then. He addressed discrimination and prejudice positively with the Fair Housing Act. Today, we have a President spitting out derogatory remarks about women who report sexual assault.This year is the 50th Anniversary of that landmark legislation, the Fair Housing Act of 1968. We have come a long way in the fight for equality and fairness, but we still aren’t there for everyone.Whether it is LGBTQ rights or respecting women, let’s pray we have leadership in Indiana and in the White House that understands the importance of addressing positively those issue of prejudice and discrimination.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Ocean City Housing Project Speeding Along in Early Stages

first_imgA big excavator sits on a mound of dirt during construction work in late June on the Speitel Commons affordable housing project. By DONALD WITTKOWSKIOcean City’s public housing agency has already jumped ahead of schedule in the early stages of a nearly $7 million project that will provide affordable housing for senior citizens now living in a flood-prone neighborhood.Construction began on the Ocean City Housing Authority’s Speitel Commons project on May 1 and is expected to take about 12 months to complete.In an encouraging sign, the authority’s contractor is already about eight to 10 days ahead of schedule and has made two adjustments that have reduced the cost by $180,000, a consultant reported Tuesday during the agency’s monthly board meeting.Construction has initially focused on completing the foundation, but will enter another critical phase in the next few weeks when work begins on the “main platform” to support the building’s superstructure.“Once they put the platform up, now you can build the building,” said Rick Ginnetti, owner of the Brooke Group, the authority’s development consultant.The 32-unit Speitel Commons project is being built next to the authority’s Bayview Manor housing complex at Sixth Street and West Avenue. The building is named in honor of the late Edmond C. Speitel Sr., a housing authority commissioner who helped to oversee the $6.9 million project from the conceptual phaseSenior citizens who now live in the authority’s flood-prone Pecks Beach Village housing complex on Fourth Street will be moved over to the Speitel Commons building when it is completed.The senior citizens portion of Pecks Beach Village, located on the north side of Fourth Street, will be torn down when Speitel Commons is finished. The housing authority has set aside $200,000 for demolition work.Pecks Beach Village also includes affordable housing for low-income families. The 40 family units are located on the south side of Fourth Street. The family units will stay for the time being, although there are longer-range plans to replace them with new housing construction.The Ocean City Housing Authority’s proposed Speitel Commons at Bayview Manor project will include 32 units of affordable housing for senior citizens. (Rendering courtesy of Haley Donovan architectural firm)At the same time Speitel Commons is being built, the authority had hoped to begin renovating the rooms this year at Bayview Manor, another affordable housing complex for senior citizens.However, the COVID-19 pandemic has delayed the renovation plan for Bayview Manor. Ginnetti explained that the authority did not want to jeopardize the health and safety of the senior citizens at Bayview Manor by allowing construction crews to enter their units.Ginnetti and the authority’s staff are collaborating on a “COVID policy” that will include safeguards to protect the Bayview Manor residents when renovations do get underway. No date has been set.Renovations are expected to begin with the building’s roof and the old electrical panels in the individual units. Residents will be moved out of their units into other parts of the building for several hours while work is done on the electrical panels.Before the residents are allowed back into their units, the rooms will be thoroughly sanitized, said Jacqueline Jones, the housing authority’s executive director.In 2019, City Council approved a $6.6 million bond ordinance to build or rehabilitate affordable housing sites for senior citizens and low-income families. The projects will help Ocean City meet its state-mandated obligation to provide its “fair share” of affordable housing as part of a court settlement in 2018.The city is expected to contribute more than $2 million toward the Speitel Commons project. The New Jersey Housing Mortgage and Finance Agency is providing $4.5 million in funding.The Ocean City Housing Authority and the city also plan to work together to build 10 affordable rental homes in locations across town. The authority will develop and manage the homes, Ginnetti said.Ginnetti estimated that the 10 houses will cost about $3.3 million. The city expects to pay $1.3 million, according to Ginnetti. During Tuesday’s board meeting, the housing authority approved plans to apply for a $2 million grant from the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs to help finance the homes.The funding application will be made through the Ocean City Community Development Corp., a nonprofit entity that was created by the housing authority in 2017 but never used. The nonprofit is being revived to apply for the money and to meet the legal requirements imposed by the Department of Community affairs on the grant, Ginnetti said.Renovation work on the residential units at Bayview Manor is delayed by the COVID-19 pandemic.last_img read more

Landlord takes a sweetener

first_imgIt’s a time-worn tradition for rock stars to stipulate indulgent treats in their contracts to perform gigs – or “riders” as they’re known – and their left-field demands often come to light under headlines like “Madonna insists on 50 cupcakes arranged in shape of her star sign, Leo” (not true, but it’s surely a matter of time). Now news has reached Stop the Week that this practice is filtering down to civilians, specifically one retail landlord in New York who has requested a cupcake rider from his bakery tenant.The landlord, Jack Resnick & Sons in Manhattan, slipped in a clause when writing up the lease for Crumbs – which has a chain of bakeries – for a dozen of Crumbs’ cupcakes to be delivered to its monthly sales meetings. As if that weren’t cheeky enough, the package must also contain one red velvet cupcake. Owner Jason Bauer is reported to have said: “I obviously picked [the contract] up on the first read and got a chuckle… I wish all landlords took an interest in our business the way they do. With most landlords, you pay your rent and that’s it.”Which brings us to Stop the Week’s rider. We won’t even get out of bed for anything less than a dozen Welsh cakes with all the raisins removed.last_img read more

Dopapod Opens Brooklyn Bowl Run With Chuck Berry Tribute, Fan Requests, And More [Photos/Audio]

first_imgOn Thursday night, prog-jam quartet Dopapod arrived at Brooklyn Bowl for their first of three nights at the Brooklyn, NY venue this weekend. While the room was well below capacity for the weeknight set, the band delivered handily, tackling a selection of their technically complex, mind-bending compositions. After opening the show with “Turn by Turn” and “Cloud World,” the and kicked into a particularly funky take on “Black and White,” followed by “Sleeping Giant,” of 2014’s Never Odd Or Even.The segment that followed would prove to be the highlight of the show: First, the band launched into a super “Sonic,” which they took for a 20+ minute ride before bleeding into “Give It A Name.” After starting into the “Give It A Name” structure the band took the opportunity to pay tribute to the late Chuck Berry, segueing into and back out of an appropriately rocking rendition of “Johnny B. Goode.” Technical composition “Trickery” came next, building slowly to a raucous peak before giving way to Drawn Onward track “Flipped.”The “Onionhead” that followed was packed full of surprises, as the band teased Pink Floyd‘s “Set Controls For The Heard of the Sun” and quoted “Johnny B. Goode” during an Eastern-inflected jam, substitution the line “play the sitar like ringing a bell” for “play the guitar like ringing a bell.” The jam even included a pronounced tease of Israeli Folk song “Hava Naglia,” a tune ubiquitous at Bar Mitzvahs, but not so often rock concerts. Finally, Dopapod closed the set with fan-favorite “Present Ghosts.”When the band returned for their encore, they congratulated a fan in the front row on his 30th Dopapod show last night, and helped the ecstatic fan celebrate the milestone by letting him decide the encore. The fan went with “Turning Knobs,” which the band performed with gusto before thanking the crowd and taking their bowsCheck out a gallery of photos from Dopapod’s Thursday night show at Brooklyn Bowl below, courtesy of photographer Andrew O’Brien.You can also stream full audio of the show below, thanks to taper Matt Moricle via archive.org: Load remaining images Dopapod returns tonight for their second of three nights at Brooklyn Bowl this weekend. To purchase tickets to either of this weekend’s upcoming shows, head to the band’s website.Setlist: Dopapod | Brooklyn Bowl | Brooklyn, NY | 3/23/17 (setlist via Phantasy Tour)Set 1: Turn by Turn, Cloud World*, Black and White, Sleeping Giant, Sonic** > Give It A Name> Johnny B. Goode**> Give it a Name, Trickery, Flipped, Onionhead3, Present GhostsEncore: Turnin’ Knobs4* contained Bluetooth tease** unfinished^ contained teases of Set Controls For the Heart of the Sun, Johnny B. Goode (Indian-style jam, substituted “play the sitar like ringing a bell” for “play the guitar like ringing a bell”), and Hava Nagila^^by request from the audience for a fan’s 30th showDopapod | Brooklyn Bowl | Brooklyn, NY | 3/23/17last_img read more

Umphrey’s McGee & Marcus King Band Tear Up Columbus, OH [Photos]

first_imgLoad remaining images Umphrey’s McGee | Express Live! | Columbus, OH | 2/1/2018 | Photo: Phierce Photo Photo: Keith Grinercenter_img Last night, Umphrey’s McGee hit Columbus, Ohio’s Express Live! ahead of the group’s two-night stand at Wings Event Center in Kalamazoo, Michigan, over the weekend. With support from the quickly rising Marcus King Band, the show was a powerhouse from start to finish.Umphrey’s McGee’s high-octane performance saw the group in truly proper form, focusing on segueing through their songs with a standout energy. One major highlight of set one was “Professor Wormbog”, which saw Jake Cinninger perform on the keys and the band run through the group’s “turbo” ending of the song, which took on an almost punk-rock feel and was greatly accelerated. Another highlight of the show was Umphrey’s McGee’s rare encore of “Andy’s Last Beer”, marking the song’s first appearance in 2018 and fourth performance since June of 2016.During the show, the group also played Radiohead’s “Weird Fishes/Arpeggi” and teased a lot of fun covers, including The New Deal’s “Glide”, Weather Report’s “River People”, and the “Underworld Theme” from Super Mario, originally by Koji Kondo.You can check out photos from last night’s show below, courtesy of Phierce Photo.Setlist: Umphrey’s McGee | Express Live! | Columbus, OH | 2/1/2018Set 1: Gurgle > Speak Up > In The Kitchen, Room to Breathe, Professor Wormbog[1] > Tribute to the Spinal Shaft[2] > In The KitchenSet 2: Looks, Domino Theory, Loose Ends > 1348, Weird Fishes/Arpeggi, Syncopated Strangers[3], Hajimemashite > Miss Tinkle’s OvertureEncore: Soul Food I -> Andy’s Last Beerlast_img read more

The River, Starring Hugh Jackman, Extends on Broadway

first_img Related Shows View Comments In addition to Jackman, The River stars Laura Donnelly and Cush Jumbo in their Broadway debuts. The River Wolverine is remaining on the Great White Way just that little bit longer! The Hugh Jackman-led The River has extended its limited engagement through February 8, 2015; the show had been set to shutter on January 25. The play opened on November 16 at Broadway’s Circle in the Square Theatre.center_img Fun Home is due to move into Circle in the Square once Jackman completes his run; the new musical begins previews on April 4. Directed by Ian Rickson, The River is Jez Butterworth’s follow-up to the Tony-nominated Jerusalem. The play, which had an acclaimed run helmed by Rickson in 2012 at London’s Royal Court Theatre, tells the story of a man and a woman in a remote cabin on the cliffs on a moonless night. Show Closed This production ended its run on Feb. 8, 2015last_img read more

Ken Watanabe, Jose Llana & Daniel Dae Kim to Step Into The King & I

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on June 26, 2016 Star Files The King and I Jose Llana View Commentscenter_img Related Shows Ken Watanabe A lineup of new and returning kings are poised to claim the throne in The King and I on Broadway. Ken Watanabe, who earned a Tony nomination for his performance as the titular King of Siam opposite Kelli O’Hara, will return to the role beginning March 1, taking over for Hoon Lee at Lincoln Center’s Vivian Beaumont Theater.Jose Llana, who previously succeeded Watanabe, will do so once more beginning April 19 for two weeks. On May 3, Daniel Dae Kim will make his Broadway debut as the King for an eight-week run.Watanabe received an Oscar nod for his performance in the 2004 film The Last Samurai. His additional film credits include Batman Begins, Inception, Letters from Iwo Jima and the 2014 reboot of Godzilla.Llana’s additional credits include here Lies Love off-Broadway, as well as Wonderland, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, Flower Drum Song, Rent, Streetcorner Symphony and the ’96 revival of The King and I (in which he played Lun Tha).Kim is best known for his performance as Jin-Soo Kwon on Lost. His additional credits include Hawaii Five-0 and Angel. In 2009, he played the King in a Royal Albert Hall engagement in London opposite Maria Friedman.Rodgers and Hammerstein’s classic musical, set in 1860s Bangkok, tells the story of the unconventional and tempestuous relationship that develops between the King of Siam and Anna Leonowens, a British schoolteacher, whom the imperious King brings to Siam to tutor his many wives and children. The current cast also includes Tony winner Ruthie Ann Miles as Lady Thiang, Conrad Ricamora as Lun Tha and Ashley Park as Tuptim.last_img read more

The Elephants of Middle Tennessee

first_imgHow did a farm south of Nashville become the country’s largest elephant sanctuary?Just before 8 a.m. on a Monday, Shirley stands in the middle of a field, using her trunk to sift through the brush on the ground. Her right hind leg bends out at an awkward, almost 45-degree angle, the lingering result of bone reconstruction after an altercation with another circus elephant over two decades ago. At 70 years old, Shirley walks slowly from a grassy patch to dry ground, swinging her trunk as she surveys the land. She stops at a sand pile, scooping chunks with her trunk and spraying them onto her back, cooling herself on an already-warm May morning.Though her injuries linger, Shirley is no longer confined to circus life. Instead, she is one of 11 total elephant residents of The Elephant Sanctuary, a home for retired performance and exhibition elephants. One of only two certified elephant sanctuaries in the U.S., the Elephant Sanctuary, located in Hohenwald, Tenn., doesn’t allow visitors; instead, Shirley’s wanderings are observed through the Sanctuary’s popular Elecams, a system of solar-powered cameras used to monitor the elephants and broadcast a live feed via the Sanctuary’s website, which Sanctuary staff also use for educational outreach programs throughout the year.Founded in 1995 by Carol Buckley and Scott Bais, the then-110-acre Sanctuary adopted its first resident—Tarra, an Asian elephant who, since the age of two, had performed in circuses and acts around the country. In the mid-1990s, after two decades of traveling and living in cramped quarters, Tarra needed land to roam as well as other elephants to interact with. “They also wanted a place where other elephants could retire and form a herd that maybe they hadn’t experienced earlier in life,” Joy Owens, The Sanctuary’s Education Manager, says of Buckley and Bais’s vision.Minnie and Ronnie / The Elephant SanctuaryBuckley and Bais chose to establish the Sanctuary in Hohenwald, Tennessee, a town of four-and-a-half square miles and close to 4,000 people, 85 miles southwest of Nashville. The climate—mild weather, short winters and warm summer temperatures—roughly mirrors a wild elephant habitat, and the duo was able to purchase a wide swath of land at low cost with the hopes of adding more elephants and acreage over time.The next elephant, a former circus elephant named Barbara, arrived a year later, in 1996. Since that time, 28 elephants—all female—have lived at The Sanctuary, including the 11 current residents who inhabit over 2,700 acres of three separate habitat areas.The Sanctuary provides a home for the elephants to live in an environment more closely matched to their needs—ample land, ample food, a pseudo-herd and unstructured days. (They also each have their own barn space, complete with heated floors in winter). Typically, captive elephants cannot be re-introduced into the wild; as such, creating a parallel environs aids in their survival—and quality of life.As threats to elephants throughout Africa and Asia have increased in recent decades, particularly poaching, trophy hunting, and habitat destruction, havens like The Elephant Sanctuary highlight the importance of saving this beautiful mammal, classified as both threatened (African elephant) and endangered (Asian elephant). There are an estimated 400,000 African elephants remaining in the world; the Asian elephant population has decreased to an estimated 40,000 worldwide.The Elephant Sanctuary and PAWS (Performing Animal Welfare Society) in California, which was founded in 1984 to protect and house formerly captive and performance wildlife animals, are the only two elephant sanctuaries in America accredited by the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries (GFAS). These organizations, as well as international non-profits and governmental organizations, are working through a variety of methods to save the species—before it’s too late.Shirley / The Elephant SanctuaryAn elephant’s day at The Sanctuary is intentionally unstructured. Elephants spend up to 18 hours a day eating, so the majority of their time is spent wandering, dining, and in some cases, socializing. While Sanctuary caregivers drop food for them, the elephants also walk around and forage independently. In the wild, a female elephant stays with her family herd for her entire life; a baby will often stay with her for up to five years. Male adult elephants, following procreation, are kicked out of the herd to live as a bachelor or with other males.Unrelated elephants typically won’t live together in the wild; at the Sanctuary, since most of the elephants aren’t related, they are gradually introduced to one another.When a new elephant arrives, she is kept on her own while the Sanctuary’s full-time staff of 45 workers, including 15 caregivers and four veterinarians, learns her health history and habits. This also allows for the new female to see, hear and smell the other elephants without being forced to share space. If the new and resident elephants are curious about each other and show positive behaviors, they are set up on ‘play dates,’ where they share space together (though African and Asian elephants are not intermingled, given the inherent species differences). If the elephants have a common fence and aren’t getting along, they won’t be introduced to one another.In 1999, Shirley arrived at The Elephant Sanctuary from a zoo in Louisiana, where she’d been the lone elephant for 22 years. Remarkably, on her first night, she recognized Jenny, an elephant she’d performed with in a circus over two decades prior. From that day onward, the two were almost inseparable, forming a mother-daughter-like bond that continued until Jenny’s passing in 2006.“They definitely have personalities and behaviors, likes, and dislikes,” Owens says. “Ronnie is the social butterfly, because she’s almost always in the company of another elephant and doesn’t like to be by herself. Flora likes to spend more time alone. A lot of behavior tells us about personalities. The caregivers see them every day and can really observe the minutiae of their behavior.”Sissy / The Elephant SanctuaryThe average life expectancy of an elephant in the wild is close to 60 years; in captivity, it is much shorter, as females living in a zoo live an average of only 17 years. “A big reason [for the shorter life expectancy] is that we haven’t been able to replicate the herd very well in captivity, and that’s really crucial to keeping an elephant happy and healthy,” Owens says. 70-year-old Shirley is the oldest elephant at The Sanctuary; at 34, Sukari is currently the youngest.Elephants sleep the least amount of any land mammal, typically only two hours a day. Otherwise, they are eating (elephants can consume hundreds of pounds of plant matter in one day), wandering, and socializing, behaviors that are limited by captivity, particularly by zoos. Instead, “providing space like The Elephant Sanctuary for elephants to be elephants is definitely the way to go,” Tanya Sanerib, Senior Attorney & International Program Legal Director for The Center for Biological Diversity, says. Elephants are also very intelligent, with the largest brains of any land mammal; enclosures, by and large, bore them.PAWS houses five African and three Asian bull elephants at ARK 2000 in San Andreas, providing the elephants—along with 22 tigers, 4 lions, 7 bears and 1 black leopard—with 2,300 acres of natural terrain to roam, lakes and pools for bathing, and elephant barns equipped with heated stalls and an indoor therapy pool.Co-founder Ed Stewart says that PAWS was established in 1984 to “be advocates and activists for the animals,” Stewart says. The sanctuary element evolved almost by happenstance; today, PAWS is central to providing a place of humane refuge for animals that have been the victims of exotic and performing animal trades (like The Elephant Sanctuary, PAWS does not use bull hooks, chains or confinement tactics.) In addition to housing animals, PAWS investigates reports of abused animals and assists in investigations by regulatory agencies to help captive wildlife.Other habitats, such as Riddles Elephant and Wildlife Sanctuary in Arkansas, house elephants, but are also open to the public for viewing, thus not considered a true sanctuary by GTAS standards. While visitors describe Riddles on social media as a “wonderful conservation home” for the two elephant residents, other unaccredited locations don’t have the same reputation.“The premise of the state of elephant conservation in North America—I think that’s a myth,” Sanerib says. “There’s nothing we’re doing in terms of keeping elephants in captivity in North America that is really, truly contributing to their conservation. A handful of zoos do really good research, and we’ve learned a certain amount about elephant communication through research on elephants in captivity. But by and large, what elephants need for their conservation is habitat: food, water, and room to roam.”The biggest threat to African elephants’ existence is poaching. In 1989, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) banned the international trade of ivory. However, domestic legal markets have continued to operate, as well as numerous black markets. Poachers seeking ivory, meat and body parts kill an estimated 100 African elephants each day, totaling over 30,000 per year.Tange / The Elephant SanctuaryUnder President Obama, the U.S. introduced a near-total ban on the commercial trade of African elephant ivory in 2016. China shut down its’ legal ivory market in late 2017; in early April of 2018, the U.K. announced a new ban on ivory sales whereby violators face up to five years in prison and heavy fines. Hong Kong has announced that it will end its ivory market by 2021.“The hope is that we will ultimately see some changes in poaching numbers on the ground and an upswing on elephants [as a result of these bans],” Sanerib says. “But we need for these measures to be really implemented, and it’ll take years to work through the system.”Some areas have seen signs of positive change. After a year-long project collaring and tracking elephants in and around Tanzania’s Selous Game Reserve, numbers indicated that killings had declined and some herds had shown signs of recovery, thanks to law enforcement crackdowns on trafficking syndicates and the continued international illegalization of the ivory trade.Another threat to elephants—which some argue is a way to help the species—is trophy hunting. In trophy hunts, private hunters pay large fees to locals to guide them in killing a specified number of elephants; the profits are intended to support the small African communities as well as conservation efforts. But studies find that the system rarely works that fluidly. As a 2017 National Geographic article and case study pointed out, the industry employs few people, and the money from the hunt fees doesn’t trickle down to needy villagers or conservation groups. Instead, those at the top keep the funds, while more elephants are killed.“With trophy hunting, we are organizationally opposed to it when it comes to imperiled species,” Sanyerib says. “That said, there are some places in Africa that don’t have the infrastructure to serve as a tourist hub, but they do have trophy hunting. If it’s well-managed and sustainable, there are times where that could be a jump-off activity to eco-tourism.”On November 5th, 2017, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced plans to lift an Obama-era ban on elephants imported from Zimbabwe and Zambia into the U.S., arguing that allowing trophy hunting would enhance the survival of the species by raising money for conservation programs.Two weeks later, after heavy public backlash over the decision, President Trump tweeted, “will be very hard pressed to change my mind that this horror show in any way helps conservation of elephants or any other animal.” The ban lift was subsequently placed on hold.Tarra / The Elephant SanctuaryThen, in early March of 2018, the Trump administration announced that it would in fact lift the ban and thus approve the import of elephant trophies on a “case-by-case basis.” Both of Trump’s adult sons are trophy hunters (as reported by the AP, “a photo of Donald Trump Jr., holding a knife over the severed tail of an elephant he reportedly killed in Zimbabwe in 2011 has sparked outrage among animal rights activists.”) Four conservation and animal protection groups, including The Center for Biological Diversity, sued the Trump administration in response; the lawsuit is pending.Another threat to elephants is loss of habitat, particularly throughout Asia. As urban development has continued, as well as the need for more land, battles have broken out between foraging elephants and humans. Elephants are a keystone species, meaning they create and maintain the ecosystems in which they live while also allowing for a myriad of plant and animal species to live in those environments. But for farmers whose livelihood depends on their crops, their first priority is keeping elephants off of their land—at all costs.In 2017, led by the International Elephant Foundation, government representatives from the Asian Elephant Ranges States (every country that has a wild Asian Elephant population) gathered in Jakarta, Indonesia, and created and signed the Jakarta Declaration for Asian Elephant Conservation, where they outlined their collective goals for elephant conservation, “and got on the same page about what we’d all do together to save the Asian elephant,” Sarah Conley, Conservation Coordinator for the International Elephant Foundation, says.Conley added that the Declaration has already started dictating policy decisions; further change is expected, particularly in the affected Asian countries as outreach efforts continue.“To make sustainable changes for the betterment of elephants and habitat, we need to make sure the local communities not just understand what we’re doing, but are involved and invested for the long-term,” Conley says.And communities like Hohenwald can help to lead the way. On East Main Street in downtown Hohenwald, The Elephant Discovery Center offers visitors the opportunity to learn more about this keystone species through self-guided exhibits and educational programming. On the second Saturday of each month, a Sanctuary staff member visits the Center to talk about a particular theme, and audience members can ask questions about caring for the elephants.While there, visitors may just hear Shirley’s trumpeting sounds, miles down the road, enjoying her refuge as she lives out her final days in peace.last_img read more

Chilean and U.S. Air Forces Train to Optimize Night Vision Goggle Use

first_imgFACh has 46 F-16 fighter jets in its fleet, made up of 10 F-16C/D Block 50/52 units acquired in 2002, 18 F-16 MLU M2 units acquired in 2005, and 18 F-16 MLU M4 units acquired in 2008, according to a report in Sur Noticias. Using training and technology to fight drug trafficking Sergeant Webb praised the FACh’s expertise, saying the FACh members were “able to find new ways of improving what we’ve been able to explain to them, and that ingenuity is propelling their Air Force in the right direction.” “The training will enable the FACh to fight the drug cartels, identify new drug trafficking routes and be more effective in their missions,” said Carlos Mendoza Mora, a security consultant with Strategic Project Consulting, a private management consulting firm in Mexico City. “The main crimes that the Chilean Air Force is facing are related to the fight against transnational organized crime – particularly the drug cartels, which have been undergoing rapid changes – and the fight against terrorism.” Cooperation between the Chilean and the U.S. Air Forces is producing good results. “The cooperation between these countries involves a sustained commitment to deter transnational criminal organizations and preserve the security and stability of the region,” Mendoza Mora said. “Whenever there is this type of exchange in terms of training, there is an appropriate level of synergy and shared knowledge that is attained between the troops and officers. Formative links are established.” “The drug cartels have been modernizing the technology that they use. The use of drones of all types has multiplied, and they are difficult to identify using traditional mechanisms, such as radar,” Mendoza Mora explained. “The use of F-16 fighter jets and NVG equipment could inhibit the use of this type of equipment.” Sergeant Webb praised the FACh’s expertise, saying the FACh members were “able to find new ways of improving what we’ve been able to explain to them, and that ingenuity is propelling their Air Force in the right direction.” The Air Force personnel from the two countries also trained in the best ways to handle equipment failures as well as to verify pre- and post-flight procedures, in addition to performing NVG inspections and calibrations. A rewarding partnership Other participants in the USAF team included Sergeant Cari Webb from the 563rd Operations Support Squadron, specializing in the flight aircrew and supervisory team, and Technical Sergeant Jeffrey Kelley, of the 372nd Training Squadron Detachment 12 F-16, specializing in avionics instruction. During their stay in Chile, the U.S. troops successfully met all of the formation’s training objectives and established a strong partnership with the FACh. “They have significant expertise in the different systems, but I think the part that surprised me was when I had the opportunity to meet with them in person, I showed them some different ways of doing things,” Aguilera said. Using training and technology to fight drug trafficking A team of three specialists from the 12th Air Force of the USAF traveled to Chile to train for four weeks with technical personnel from the FACh. The training focused on improving maintenance procedures and the correct use of NVG, Infodefensa reported on January 23. The first training session was held last June, when 12 FACh officers trained for 15 days with two specialists from the 12th Air Force of the USAF in the performance, alignment, and adjustment of night vision goggles. The night vision technology will help the Chilean Air Force fight drug trafficking by detecting narco-flights. “The training will enable the FACh to fight the drug cartels, identify new drug trafficking routes and be more effective in their missions,” said Carlos Mendoza Mora, a security consultant with Strategic Project Consulting, a private management consulting firm in Mexico City. “The main crimes that the Chilean Air Force is facing are related to the fight against transnational organized crime – particularly the drug cartels, which have been undergoing rapid changes – and the fight against terrorism.” During their stay in Chile, the U.S. troops successfully met all of the formation’s training objectives and established a strong partnership with the FACh. Air Force personnel from both countries praised the joint training sessions. The Air Force personnel from the two countries also trained in the best ways to handle equipment failures as well as to verify pre- and post-flight procedures, in addition to performing NVG inspections and calibrations. The viewing devices can be used in areas with little or no visibility. They capture the existing ambient light and transform the incoming photons into electrons, which then penetrate the lens to become amplified on a phosphor screen. Night vision goggles, monocles, and multifunctional systems are optical devices that allow crew members to operate without problems in the middle of the night, according to the website Visores Nocturnos. Cooperation between the Chilean and the U.S. Air Forces is producing good results. Other participants in the USAF team included Sergeant Cari Webb from the 563rd Operations Support Squadron, specializing in the flight aircrew and supervisory team, and Technical Sergeant Jeffrey Kelley, of the 372nd Training Squadron Detachment 12 F-16, specializing in avionics instruction. “It was very rewarding to work with them [the FACh members]; the partnership that we have developed with them has been very useful,” said Master Sergeant Jeremy Jacobs, manager of tactical aircraft for the USAF’s 12th Air Force (Air Forces Southern) and team leader for the training session in Chile, according to a January 7 USAF news release. The Chilean Air Force (FACh) recently trained with the U.S. Air Force (USAF) on the best ways to use night vision goggles (NVG) in F-16 fighter jets. The training will strengthen the nighttime operations of the FACh. center_img “Sometimes, it’s not about the help being provided, but what you can learn from the people you are helping, and during this trip I’ve learned a lot from the Chilean Air Force,” Jacobs added. The Chilean Air Force (FACh) recently trained with the U.S. Air Force (USAF) on the best ways to use night vision goggles (NVG) in F-16 fighter jets. The training will strengthen the nighttime operations of the FACh. The first training session was held last June, when 12 FACh officers trained for 15 days with two specialists from the 12th Air Force of the USAF in the performance, alignment, and adjustment of night vision goggles. “Working with members of the United States Air Force has been incredible,” said Chilean Airman Pedro Aguilera, according to the USAF. A rewarding partnership Air Force personnel from both countries praised the joint training sessions. “The drug cartels have been modernizing the technology that they use. The use of drones of all types has multiplied, and they are difficult to identify using traditional mechanisms, such as radar,” Mendoza Mora explained. “The use of F-16 fighter jets and NVG equipment could inhibit the use of this type of equipment.” “The cooperation between these countries involves a sustained commitment to deter transnational criminal organizations and preserve the security and stability of the region,” Mendoza Mora said. “Whenever there is this type of exchange in terms of training, there is an appropriate level of synergy and shared knowledge that is attained between the troops and officers. Formative links are established.” This is the third joint training session since June between the two air forces. In December, personnel from the two partner nations trained together at the Los Cóndores Air Base in Iquique, which is home to the First Air Brigade, and at the Cerro Moreno Air Base in Antofagasta, which is home to the No. 7 and No. 8 Aviation Groups of the Fifth Air Brigade. A team of three specialists from the 12th Air Force of the USAF traveled to Chile to train for four weeks with technical personnel from the FACh. The training focused on improving maintenance procedures and the correct use of NVG, Infodefensa reported on January 23. NVG operations are not improvised. Detailed planning is carried out on the route to be taken. Prior flybys are made to mark the route, map the area, and record the paths taken; that information is then applied to actual flights, El Mercurio reported on June 14, 2011. The viewing devices can be used in areas with little or no visibility. They capture the existing ambient light and transform the incoming photons into electrons, which then penetrate the lens to become amplified on a phosphor screen. “Sometimes, it’s not about the help being provided, but what you can learn from the people you are helping, and during this trip I’ve learned a lot from the Chilean Air Force,” Jacobs added. FACh has 46 F-16 fighter jets in its fleet, made up of 10 F-16C/D Block 50/52 units acquired in 2002, 18 F-16 MLU M2 units acquired in 2005, and 18 F-16 MLU M4 units acquired in 2008, according to a report in Sur Noticias. “It was very rewarding to work with them [the FACh members]; the partnership that we have developed with them has been very useful,” said Master Sergeant Jeremy Jacobs, manager of tactical aircraft for the USAF’s 12th Air Force (Air Forces Southern) and team leader for the training session in Chile, according to a January 7 USAF news release. By Dialogo March 09, 2015 The utility of night vision goggles This is the third joint training session since June between the two air forces. In December, personnel from the two partner nations trained together at the Los Cóndores Air Base in Iquique, which is home to the First Air Brigade, and at the Cerro Moreno Air Base in Antofagasta, which is home to the No. 7 and No. 8 Aviation Groups of the Fifth Air Brigade. “Working with members of the United States Air Force has been incredible,” said Chilean Airman Pedro Aguilera, according to the USAF. The utility of night vision goggles Night vision goggles, monocles, and multifunctional systems are optical devices that allow crew members to operate without problems in the middle of the night, according to the website Visores Nocturnos. “They have significant expertise in the different systems, but I think the part that surprised me was when I had the opportunity to meet with them in person, I showed them some different ways of doing things,” Aguilera said. NVG operations are not improvised. Detailed planning is carried out on the route to be taken. Prior flybys are made to mark the route, map the area, and record the paths taken; that information is then applied to actual flights, El Mercurio reported on June 14, 2011. The night vision technology will help the Chilean Air Force fight drug trafficking by detecting narco-flights. All training is based on strategic planning; what matters is to determine its OBJECTIVElast_img read more