Jubilee Ministry grants awarded for Episcopal programs, mission work

first_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Jubilee Ministry grants awarded for Episcopal programs, mission work Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Press Release Service Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] The Episcopal Church has awarded 67 Jubilee Ministry grants in 35 dioceses for 2012 in two categories for $55,750 to support mission and ministry throughout the Episcopal Church.The 2012 categories are health/nutrition and diocesan initiatives.Jubilee Ministries are congregations or agencies with connections to the Episcopal Church whose mission efforts affect the lives of those in need, addressing basic human needs and justice issues. Grants to Jubilee Ministries are awarded annually.Health/nutritionA total of 45 grants for $750 each for funding to 28 dioceses for Jubilee Ministries that respond to the nutritional needs of food deserts. A food desert is a district with little or no access to foods needed to maintain a healthy diet but often served by fast food restaurants. $33,750.00• Diocese of California: Holy Child Health & Wellness Program/Bread for the World Ministry• Diocese of California: St. Cyprian’s Community Kitchen• Diocese of Chicago: Shelter Care Ministries• Diocese of Chicago: St. Clement’s Jubilee Ministries• Diocese of Colorado: Brigit’s Bounty• Diocese of Colorado: Broomfield Farmers’ Market at Holy Comforter Episcopal Church• Diocese of Colorado: Cooperating Ministry of Logan County• Diocese of Colorado: Metro CareRing• Diocese of Colorado: St. Clare’s Ministries• Diocese of Colorado: St. Joseph Episcopal Church Outreach Ministry and Peace & Justice Ministry Communities• Diocese of Colorado: St. Patrick’s Episcopal Food Pantry• Diocese of Connecticut: Trinity Episcopal Church/Trinity Episcopal Day School on Asylum Hill• Diocese of Dallas: Our Saviour Community Garden• Diocese of East Tennessee: The Hosanna Community• Diocese of Iowa: St. Thomas Community Garden• Diocese of Kansas: Episcopal Social Services/Venture House (ESS/Venture House)• Diocese of Kansas: St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City, KS• Diocese of Lexington: Reading Camp• Diocese of Lexington: St. Paul’s Food Pantry• Diocese of Maine: Trinity Jubilee Center• Diocese of Michigan: Bound Together• Diocese of New Jersey: Christ Church New Brunswick Food Pantry• Diocese of New Jersey: Peter’s House• Diocese of New Jersey: St. Andrew’s Jubilee Center• Diocese of New Jersey: Trinity Cathedral Food Pantry Ministry• Diocese of New York: People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWA)• Diocese of New York: The Community Food Pantry at St. Mary’s Mohegan Lake• Diocese of Newark: Jubilee Center/All Saints Community Service and Development Corp. (ASCSDC)• Diocese of Northern Michigan:  Grace Church Community Garden• Diocese of Ohio: St. James Lunch Program• Diocese of Olympia: Eco-Justice Ministry of St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral, Seattle, WA• Diocese of Pennsylvania: St. Mary’s Episcopal Church Food Pantry• Diocese of Rio Grande: Our Lady of Las Palomas• Diocese of Rio Grande: Outreach Ministries, St. James Episcopal Church, Taos, NM• Diocese of San Diego: Episcopal Refugee Network• Diocese of San Diego:  St. Mark’s Episcopal Church• Diocese of Southern Ohio: Episcopal Community Services Foundation• Diocese of Southern Ohio:  St. John’s Episcopal Church• Diocese of Southern Virginia: Church of the Ascension, Norfolk• Diocese of Spokane: Trinity Neighborhood Services• Diocese of Virginia: Christ Church Cares Food Pantry• Diocese of West Texas: International Community Garden at St. Francis Episcopal Church• Diocese of Western Louisiana: St. Luke’s Episcopal Mobile Medical Ministry• Diocese of Western Michigan: St. Mark’s Episcopal Church• Diocese of Western New York: Trinity Produce PantryJubilee Ministry diocesan initiativesA total of 22 Jubilee Ministry diocesan development grants of $1,000 each will fund 22 dioceses to support Jubilee Ministry development plans of the local bishop and the appointed diocesan jubilee officer.  $22,000.00• Diocese of California: Santiago/St. James Ministry Center• Diocese of Chicago: Episcopal Diocese of Chicago• Diocese of Colorado: Diocesan Jubilee Office, Diocese of Colorado• Diocese of Connecticut: Trinity Episcopal Church/Trinity Episcopal Day School on Asylum Hill• Diocese of Dallas: Diocese of Dallas Jubilee Ministry• Diocese of East Tennessee: Diocese of East Tennessee• Diocese of Florida: Grace Mission Episcopal Church• Diocese of Kansas: Diocese of Kansas• Diocese of Lexington: Reading Camp• Diocese of Maryland: Harford Family House, Inc.• Diocese of Montana: St. Michael & All Angels Wood Bank Ministry• Diocese of Navajoland: Welcoming Them Home• Diocese of New Jersey: Diocese of New Jersey• Diocese of Northern Michigan: Diocese of Northern Michigan• Diocese of Pittsburg: Coal Country Hangout Youth Center• Diocese of San Diego: Episcopal Church Center, Ocean Beach, San Diego, CA• Diocese of Southern Ohio: Gabriel’s Place• Diocese of Southwest Florida: Cornerstone Kids, Inc. at St. James House of Prayer Episcopal Church• Diocese of Spokane: Diocese of Spokane• Diocese of Texas: St. John’s After School Program• Diocese of Western Michigan: Diocese of Western Michigan• Diocese of Western New York: The Episcopal Partnership for Mission and OutreachFor more information contact Sam McDonald, Deputy Chief Operating Officer and Director of Mission, [email protected] In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Posted Dec 18, 2012 Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Events Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY center_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more

TEConversation calls on Episcopalians to care for creation

first_img Tags Mary Lou Miller says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bernadette Demientieff, Alaska Native Gwich’in from Fort Yukon, Alaska, offers an emotional witness to the destruction of sacred lands and waters of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge during the third and final TEConversation, Care of Creation, on July 10, at the 79th General Convention, Austin, Texas. Photo: Sharon Tillman/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Austin, Texas] When Native Alaskan Bernadette Demientieff took the stage in front of a joint session of the 79th General Convention assembled for the final TEConversation on July 10, she didn’t so much give a presentation, as scheduled. Instead, she testified in a trembling voice to the destruction of the Gwich’in way of life.“We are not asking for jobs, not asking for schools. We are asking for the respect to live as we always have and keep our identity as Gwich’in,” Demientieff said.The Gwich’in people’s existence has for centuries depended on the Porcupine caribou, whose calving ground lies within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge’s coastal plain. To the Gwich’in, the refuge is sacred; to energy companies the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, particularly its 1.5-million acre coastal plain, is a potential oil and natural gas bonanza. This conflict has fueled for more than 30 years a contentious debate over whether this coastal plain should be opened to oil drilling or kept as unspoiled habitat.In December 2017, the Trump administration and congressional Republicans opened the refuge to oil exploration. Earlier this year in April, it took its first step toward allowing drilling.Even in times of food shortage and starvation, the Gwich’in haven’t gone into the coastal plain, which they consider “the sacred place where life begins,” said Demientieff, who after high school drifted away from her Gwich’in identity only to recover it later in life and use her voice to speak for future generations and the animals that cannot speak for themselves.A highlight of General Convention, the TEConversations were part of the three joint sessions of General Convention, each focused on one of its three priorities: racial reconciliation, evangelism and care of creation.Each 90-minute session included three speakers, videos and music and ended with deeper, small-group discussions. The speakers represented international leaders, well-known Episcopalians and rising voices in the church.Archbishop of Cape Town and Metropolitan of the Anglican Church of Southern Africa, the Most Rev. Thabo Makgoba, speaks to his people’s challenges to survive climate change in sub-Saharan Africa during the Care of Creation TEConversation on July 10 at the 79th General Convention, Austin, Texas. Photo: Sharon Tillman/Episcopal News ServiceBishops and deputies also heard from Cape Town Archbishop Thabo Cecil Makgoba, who reminded them that in Genesis 2:15, “God takes a woman and a man and he puts them in trust … to see that creation is not exploited but that it flourishes.”Unfortunately, that’s not what has happened, and the poor and the marginalized, especially those living in Latin America, Southeast Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, are paying the highest price.In today’s world, where water is scarce or taken for granted as something that flows from the tap and is sold as a commodity, “900 million people do not have access to the lifesaving 20 liters of water a day because the needs of the poorest of the poor are not taken into consideration,” he said.Water is mentioned 722 times in the Bible, said Makgoba. “The issue of water justice and climate care is real. We don’t have time to be quibbling about the science. We don’t need to be quibbling about the details. We need praxis.”The final speaker, the Rev. Stephanie McDyre Johnson, talked about growing up in the Hudson River Valley, where in the 1970s rivers were catching fire and fish were dying.As a fourth-grader, she went on folk singer and environmental activist Pete Seeger’s Clearwater Sloop, and her teacher said not to put her hands in the water because it was too polluted and too dirty.That was before the federal government passed laws, including the Clean Water Act, to protect human health and the environment.The Rev. Stephanie McDyre Johnson blends her passion for the environment with her ministry as a priest to serve as the co-chair of the Episcopal Church’s Advisory Council on the Care of Creation. Johnson speaks at the third and final TEConversation, Care of Creation, July 10, at the 79th General Convention, Austin, Texas. Photo: Sharon Tillman/Episcopal News ServiceYears later, Johnson took her own family to the region’s annual Clearwater Festival, and fish had returned to the Hudson River.“This is the symbol of hope that I need,” she said. “The symbol of resurrection that God calls us to.”Johnson spent 20 years as an environmental consultant. Following seminary, she eventually combined her love of the environment with theology. She is rector of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Riverside, Connecticut, and co-chair of the Episcopal Church’s Advisory Council on the Care of Creation, which distributed $300,000 in small grants over 18 months for innovative environmental programs across the Episcopal Church.The environmental laws enacted in the 1970s reversed a lot the damage caused by industry; however, today those laws are under attack. During this General Convention, the church is considering legislation to strengthen its stance on creation care and environmental stewardship.— Lynette Wilson is a reporter and managing editor of Episcopal News Service. Rev. Dr. James Hargis says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York July 13, 2018 at 6:00 pm When government policy threatens the well-being of the Gwich’in, or inaction on climate change threatens the health and welfare of people around the world, those are not just “political” problems. Jesus tells us to love God with our whole being, and likewise to love our neighbor as ourselves. In this time when our actions affect people all over the world, our love of God and our neighbor must extend to the entirety of God’s Creation. And that requires the Church, and each of us, to speak out against injustice or policies which create needless harm. General Convention, Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL By Lynette WilsonPosted Jul 10, 2018 Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books John Brewster says: Rector Smithfield, NC Advocacy Peace & Justice, Scott Glidden says: Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Dana Sawyer says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab July 13, 2018 at 2:47 pm I agree with Dr Hargis, and as we love the Lord our actions become more aware of our need to love His creation. The EC is far too political in many areas…Trump bashing homosexual agendaetc which divert from the real reason the church exists. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET July 11, 2018 at 8:49 pm Creation care isn’t limited to political action. As I understand it, creation care has to do with our individual actions, as well as our family and parish actions — as well as our local, state, and federal actions. I welcome the church’s guidance and inspiration for new possibilities. Comments are closed. Featured Jobs & Calls Catherine Morgan says: July 11, 2018 at 4:12 pm Surely we must take part in the care of creation. I have been appalled at the sight of oceans devastated by plastic garbage. I try to recycle as much as I can. It is easy to use cloth bags for shopping, perhaps we could begin by banning plastic bags. There must surely be a way to preserve the Arctic. However, reading about Mt Everest and the garbage dumped there,it is obvious that for some, the whole earth can be used as a dumping ground. Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY Wanda Arcos says: July 11, 2018 at 8:14 am Taking care of the earth and the lands and waters within it is part of God’s call to us. Through our human frailty, sadly that trust has now become “political.” Shouldn’t we praise actions of responsible leaders who passed the Clean Air Act which resulted in the clean up of polluted waters and air throughout the country? Surely there can also be a God driven solution to the Arctic that does not result in despoiling it. We need to listen to those who are working to honor God’s trust in us. TEConversation calls on Episcopalians to care for creation Gwich’in woman gives heart-wrenching testimony Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group center_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC July 11, 2018 at 7:44 am If the”business” of the Episcopal Church is to ignore the world around us and to simply kneel in prayer, we are turning our backs on the One we pledge to follow. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Environment & Climate Change, Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY General Convention 2018 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Collierville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA July 10, 2018 at 9:49 pm The real wealth of the Nation lies in the resources of the earth — soil, water, forests, minerals, and wildlife. To utilize them for present needs while insuring their preservation for future generations requires a delicately balanced and continuing program, based on the most extensive research. Their administration is not properly, and cannot be, a matter of politics.By long tradition, the agencies responsible for these resources have been directed by men of professional stature and experience, who have understood, respected, and been guided by the findings of their scientists.[…]For many years public-spirited citizens throughout the country have been working for the conservation of the natural resources, realizing their vital importance to the Nation. Apparently their hard-won progress is to be wiped out, as a politically minded Administration returns us to the dark ages of unrestrained exploitation and destruction.It is one of the ironies of our time that, while concentrating on the defense of our country against enemies from without, we should be so heedless of those who would destroy it from within.Rachel Carson1953 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC July 10, 2018 at 10:51 pm What has this to do with the business of the Episcopal Church? I understand and sympathize with these people, but the Church is not the venue for political action. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI cynthia seddon says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Andrew Poland says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI cynthia seddon says: July 11, 2018 at 5:32 pm It is through political action that we can best answer our call to be caretakers of our world for it is through political action, in the greatest part, that our physical world is being attacked. The Episcopal Church uses political action to further our support of other justice issues. How is this issue different? Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ July 11, 2018 at 9:17 pm As a part Native American, we must revere our earth; but we must also wisely use the resources with which we’ve been blessed. The key is balance and harmony. This ill-advised political action won’t make any difference. TEC needs to focus on Jesus, not on political caprice, like bashing Trump! Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Comments (10) Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Featured Eventslast_img read more

Orange County Library District: By the numbers

first_img Another one for the books: Orange County Library District publishes comprehensive Financial Report for 2017From the Orange County Board of County Commissioners  Last month, the Orange County Library District opened the New Year with the release of its Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for last fiscal year ending on September 30, 2017. The purpose of this report is to fulfill requirements established by State statute: The District’s financial statements must be published within one year of the ending of the previous fiscal year; be presented in conformance with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) as applied to government entities; and be audited in accordance with GAAP by licensed certified public accountants. For 14 consecutive years, the District has been awarded a Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting for its annual financial reports. The Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) awards this certificate to a government who has published an easily readable and efficiently organized annual financial report, amongst other requirements. Believing that it continues to meet such requirements, the District plans to submit its latest report for consideration of earning the fifteenth certificate. Before discussing highlights and specifics from this financial report, it is necessary to briefly review the history of the District and the purpose it serves.The Orange County Library District was first established by a special state law (Chapter 80-555, Laws of Florida) and approved by referendum in 1990 as an independent special taxing district to provide library services for citizens residing in Orange County. This act, in its original form, has since been amended and recodified and can be found in Chapter 99-486, Laws of Florida. Members of the Library Board of Trustees are appointed by the District’s Governing Board. The Library Board of Trustees, comprised of five members, is responsible for managing, administering, and operating all library facilities and services of the District. Library services are provided to about 1,267,700 residents through the 290,000 square foot Main Library building in Downtown Orlando, and 15 branch locations ranging in size from 5,600-15,700 square feet.Given that the District provides local services to residents, information from the financial statements is often better understood when presented in the broad perspective of the local economy; the local economy is substantially driven by the tourism industry. Among the major employers in the District, the two largest property taxpayers are Walt Disney World Company and Universal Studios. The District is primarily funded through property tax revenues. From fiscal year 2009-2013, the District’s property tax revenues dropped $8,948,000 (25%). However, property values have since then bounced back and are expected to increase to $40,000,000 by the fiscal year 2018.Having first opened in March of 1985, many of the building systems and interior of the Main Library building have either been replaced or renovated in the last 10 years. Remaining projects for the building pending completion in the future include the following: Replacing the emergency generator, renovating the fifth floor, and constructing emergency exit gates and fencing to improve security. The District’s General Fund (used to account for all revenues and expenditures applicable to general operations), in combination with property tax revenues and reserves, will most likely fund these projects. In addition, the District has been transferring money from its General Fund to the Capital Projects Fund every year for the development of future branches; a $1,027,374 increase in the Capital Projects Fund for 2017 was attributable to a $1,000,000 transfer from the General Fund for the purpose of future branch development, and $27,374 in investment income. Of course, the District has and will continue to keep an eye out for opportunities for the development of future branch libraries in high growth areas when needed.According to the Government-wide Financial Analysis within the report, the net position overtime may become a helpful tool in determining the District’s financial position. During the 2017 fiscal year, the District increased its net position through operating results by $653,196 and assets and deferred outflows of resources exceeded liabilities and deferred inflows of resources by $51,437,116 as of the end of the fiscal year. The largest portion of the District’s net position is its investment in capital assets, including land, buildings, improvements, furniture, equipment, computer equipment, library books, and construction in progress; the capital assets are used to provide library services and thus not available for future spending. No debt is associated with these assets.Residents interested in reviewing the full Comprehensive Financial Report can do so via the following link: https://www.ocls.info/sites/default/files/CAFR2017_0.pdf. Please enter your name here TAGSOrange County Library System Previous articleFarmworkers Forum yields first look at City Commission candidatesNext articleBlood tests could reveal the missing pieces in your nutrition puzzle Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Please enter your comment!last_img read more

Calls to the Charity Commission will cost less

first_imgCalls to the Charity Commission will cost less Howard Lake | 14 September 2005 | News The Charity Commission has changed its main contact number so that callers will pay only a local rate.The new number is 0845 3000 218. Previously the 200,000 or so callers who contacted the Commission each year were charged at national rate. Minicom users can contact the Commission on 0845 3000 219. Calls to the former number will be automatically redirected.Nick Allaway, responsible for information and corporate services at the Charity Commission, said: “This is the latest in a series of changes since the Charity Commission began a review of its activities late last year. Since then, we’ve been working to steadily improve the services we provide to our customers, and ensure that these are responsive and accessible.” Advertisement  30 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Three fundraising apps for April 2015

first_img2. TinboxTinbox, still in beta, lets users direct a company’s charitable giving to a particular charity one euro at a time, without costing the individual anything.Developed in Paris, the app’s creators are partnering with larger companies to tap into their CSR activities.Users of the app choose a charity, then select items from a ‘shopping list’ for particular projects – such as medical or educational items. When they click on that item they generate the donation. In return the donating company’s logo pops up for five seconds.Software company SAP is an early commercial partner, donating up to 10,000 clicks.[youtube height=”450″ width=”800″]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GXAbBqSdTww[/youtube] AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: app Digital mobile Here is our roundup of the latest mobile apps that include a fundraising function.1. DonateLocateDonateLocate – the solution to helping people without giving direct.The Donate Locate app has been developed to encourage people to share the location of a homeless person spotted sleeping rough in Westminster, London while also donating £1, £3, or £5 to The Connection at St Martin’s.The app thereby combines fundraising with practical help, alerting The Connection’s street team to where they can help.The app was developed by direct marketing agency Soul, who had previously worked with the charity on an anti-giving campaign.Shaun Moran, founding partner and creative director of Soul, said:“The app the untimely benefits three audiences – the user, the outreach worker and the homeless person.”You can download DonateLocate from iTunes at no charge. About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Advertisement Three fundraising apps for April 2015  3. Shaun in the City: Sheep Spotter Howard Lake | 9 April 2015 | News  62 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The app promotes the sculpture trail of 50 five-foot artist-decorated Shauns the Sheep in London and Bristol. Developed by Bristol’s Aardman Animations, Shaun in the City costs £1.49 to download and all proceeds generated will be donated to one of two charities.Funds raised during the London trail will support children in hospitals across the UK, through Wallace & Gromit’s Children’s Charity, and money raised from the Bristol trail will benefit The Grand Appeal, the Bristol Children’s Hospital CharityIt is available on iOS and Android, with more details from Shaun in the City.last_img read more

Men’s tennis wins at Texas Tech, caps undefeated Big 12 regular season

first_imgBen Auten is a junior sports broadcasting major from Charleston, South Carolina. He is an avid sports fan; he especially loves college basketball, baseball, and soccer. TCU rowing program strengthens after facing COVID-19 setbacks TCU baseball finds their biggest fan just by saying hello TAGSBig 12post season Neeley School professor hosting ‘Entrepreneurship Boot Camp’ + posts Courtesy of gofrogs.com Facebook Facebook Ben Autenhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/ben-auten/ Ben Autenhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/ben-auten/ Ben Auten What we’re reading: Congress making moves New medical school will not reserve seats for TCU studentscenter_img ReddIt Ben Autenhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/ben-auten/ Linkedin Twitter ReddIt Linkedin printTCU had already clinched at least a share of the Big 12 regular season title, but a 4-2 win over Texas Tech secured an outright title heading into the conference tournament.TCU (18-3, 4-0) was led by doubles newcomer Max Kurzban and his partner Reese Stalder, who downed Texas Tech’s Matheus Leite and Tommy Mylnikov 6-4 to earn the doubles point for the Frogs.“We got a huge win at number three doubles to give us a critical doubles point,” head coach David Roditi said. “Max Kurzban stepped up with Reese Stalder and they prepared well and it paid off.”Stalder and Leite met again in singles play on court five and Stalder cruised to a 6-3, 6-1 win. Senior Trevor Johnson picked up his second victory of the afternoon to give TCU an early 3-0 lead in the match.Texas Tech (19-9, 1-4) responded with a pair of victories, including Connor Curry’s win over No. 91 Guillermo Nuñez 6-4, 7-6 (7-2) to trim the Horned Frogs’ lead to 3-2.No. 57 Alastair Gray recovered from a first-set loss on court four to down Tech’s Ilgiz Valiev 6-7 (2-7), 6-4, 6-4 to finish off the Red Raiders and give TCU a win in their final match of the regular season.“Winning here takes a lot more than just tennis,” Roditi said. “I am proud of our guys for rising to the challenge.”Up Next:With the regular season title secured, TCU earned the No. 1 seed in the Big 12 Tournament in Austin, Texas. The Frogs will have a first-round bye and won’t play until Saturday, April 28. Center for International Studies creates new study abroad option Previous articleHoroscope: April 23, 2018Next articleBaseball swept by Baylor for first time in 18 years Ben Auten RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Ben Autenhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/ben-auten/ Another series win lands TCU Baseball in the top 5, earns Sikes conference award last_img read more

“Press Freedom Award – A signal to Europe” to two italian journalists

first_img News December 10, 2012 – Updated on January 20, 2016 “Press Freedom Award – A signal to Europe” to two italian journalists Receive email alerts Organisation June 2, 2021 Find out more November 23, 2020 Find out more December 2, 2020 Find out more In his laudatio, Domenico Affinito, Vice president of the Italian section of Reporters Without Borders emphasizes: „Italian Journalism is sick, but not yet dead. Conflict of interest, self-censorship, threats of organized crime, low quality of news media, asymmetric distribution of resources in the media – all this is a toxic cocktail for modern democracy. And these are just some of the problems we are facing today. We need to improve our journalism; and for that we have to start with our young journalists. The recognition through this years’ Press Freedom Award to two young Italian journalists is help for our cause.“ Alessia Cerantola works as a freelance journalist and filmmaker. In her award winning piece she describes the dire working conditions of freelancers in Italy. She pays tribute to Pierpaolo Faggiano who committed suicide because of his desperate professional situation more than a year ago. The award winning article was published by the periodical of the “European Journalism Centre” in November 2011 and by the “European Journalism Observatory” of the BBC Academy. Use the Digital Services Act to make democracy prevail over platform interests, RSF tells EU Help by sharing this information Ten RSF recommendations for the European Union News Emanuela Zuccalá is a freelance journalist, blogger, author and producer of documentaries. She won the award for her piece on women refugees in Africa, “The Diaries of Women Prisoners in the Desert”. Her article is an exemplary study of people who have been forgotten by the world. Her article has been published by the weekly Io Donna, a supplement of the leading Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera. Zuccalá works for Io Donna since 2001. News RSF_en Reporters Without Borders Austria awards this price since 2001. Its aim is to support journalists who work for democracy and the freedom of information. Last year’s award went to Hungarian journalists. The articles of the winners, Emanuela Zuccalá and Alessia Cerantola, highlight today’s working conditions of Italian journalists. “Alessia Cerontola analyses those difficult conditions, Emanuela Zuccalá chose a parable to point a finger at the abuse of human rights in her country”, says Eva Nowotny, member of the jury and president of the Austrian UNESCO commission.”We are all worried by the berlusconisation of the Italian press and by the precarious working conditions of journalists in this country. Can you imagine to write an article for eight euro?”, asked Rubina Möhring, president of Reporters Without Borders Austria during the presentation of the 2012 Press Freedom Award in Vienna. Follow the news on Austria AustriaEurope – Central Asia Emanuela Zuccalá and Alessia Cerantola are this years’ winners of the “Press Freedom Award- A Signal to Europe”. RSF and 60 other organisations call for an EU anti-SLAPP directive The articles are going to be published on December by the quarterly press.freedom.now. News to go further AustriaEurope – Central Asia last_img read more

Newspaper editor held under new anti-terrorism law

first_img Receive email alerts June 11, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Newspaper editor held under new anti-terrorism law NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say News Morocco / Western SaharaMiddle East – North Africa Follow the news on Morocco / Western Sahara Reporters Without Borders protested today against the detention of Mustapha Alaoui, the managing editor of the Arabic-language weekly Al Ousboue, who has been held under a new anti-terrorism law for the past six days for publishing a letter from a hitherto unknown group claiming responsibility for three of the five bombings in Casablanca on 16 May.Aged 67, Alaoui was detained on 5 June at his home and placed in custody. On 7 June, he was rushed to Ibn Rochd hospital in Casablanca because of a diabetic attack. He was transferred to Sale prison near Rabat yesterday and was supposed to appear before an investigating judge today.”We call for Alaoui’s immediate release, especially as his health has deteriorated in the course of his detention,” Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Robert Ménard said. “If he has to be interrogated as part of this investigation, he should at least be free when he appears before the judge,” Ménard said.Ménard said Reporters Without Borders had already criticised parts of the anti-terrorism law recently passed by parliament. “Today we are witnessing the first of the abuses this law is capable of producing,” he added.Alaoui was arrested shortly after the latest issue of his weekly appeared on the stands. Its front page carried the text of the letter from an unknown group calling itself Assaïqa claiming three of the five Casablanca bombings. The prosecutor’s office described the letter’s publication as “a flagrant violation of criminal law provisions, especially those in the law on the struggle against terrorism.” Help by sharing this information Organisation News Hunger strike is last resort for some imprisoned Moroccan journalistscenter_img Morocco / Western SaharaMiddle East – North Africa April 15, 2021 Find out more June 8, 2021 Find out more News RSF joins Middle East and North Africa coalition to combat digital surveillance April 28, 2021 Find out more RSF_en to go further Newslast_img read more

Authorities obstruct foreign journalists, step up controls and propaganda in Tibet / 外国记者进入西藏更加困难,政府方面的控制和宣传却进一步加强

first_img March 20, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Authorities obstruct foreign journalists, step up controls and propaganda in Tibet / 外国记者进入西藏更加困难,政府方面的控制和宣传却进一步加强 News Reporters Without Borders is outraged by the methods being used by the Chinese authorities to obstruct foreign journalists trying to cover the situation in the Tibetan regions, and calls for the immediate and unconditional return of the foreign press to Tibet and to nearby provinces with a sizable Tibetan population. RSF_en Follow the news on China Receive email alerts ChinaAsia – Pacific News News Help by sharing this information to go further Newscenter_img March 12, 2021 Find out more Organisation China’s Cyber ​​Censorship Figures Democracies need “reciprocity mechanism” to combat propaganda by authoritarian regimes ChinaAsia – Pacific June 2, 2021 Find out more China: Political commentator sentenced to eight months in prison April 27, 2021 Find out more ————-无国界记者谴责中国政府阻止外国记者采访报道发生在西藏的暴力事件。我们强烈要求中国政府立即放开对外国记者进入西藏及其它藏区的限制。中国政府在西藏加强了对外国电台的干扰,而拉萨的网吧都收到了加强管理的通知。同时,中国政府也加强了批判“达赖喇嘛集团”和“不负责任”的外国媒体的宣传攻势。“北京方面正在通过武力来控制和解决西藏的抗议事件。在把所有不受欢迎的外来观察者们都驱逐出西藏和其它藏区后,中国的安全力量把西藏的抗议事件隔离到所有观察家的视线之外。联合国应该给中国施加压力以使外国记者重回西藏,并且往西藏派遣独立观察员。”无国界记者发表声明。3月20日,中国政府将德国《时代周报》的记者乔治·布鲁姆(Georg Blume)和奥地利记者克里斯丁·库弗(Kristin Kupfer)驱逐出西藏。“一名中国高级官员威胁我们说将吊销我们的签证。”布鲁姆对德新社说。在与中国警方周旋了五天之后,他们最终还是被强制乘坐火车离开西藏。也是在这一周,《经济学人》杂志的记者麦杰斯(James Milles)和一组大约15名香港记者也在中国警方的压力下被迫离开拉萨。从3月10日以来,无国界记者共计统计到40多次外国记者被中国警方干预工作,禁止他们在拉萨、北京、成都、西宁以及甘肃、四川、青海等省的地方自由采访。在中国的外国记者俱乐部说3月17日曾有一小组芬兰电视记者在甘肃省夏河被当地警察逮捕。记者们的安全遭到威胁,他们的设备被没收。“如果你不交出你的摄像器材,后果自负。”一名警官这样威胁记者马克南姆(Katri Makkonen)。同样在夏河,3月16日,英国ITV电视台的几名记者在被警察发现身份之后被强制要求离开。便衣警察录下了这些英国记者的行踪。其中记者琼斯∙芮(John Ray)说他们的中国司机在被警察查看车牌和驾驶证时被吓得魂飞魄散。成都警察在3月16日阻止了美国ABC电视台的几名记者在一个藏族聚居区拍摄,将他们强行塞进出租车送走。美国国家电台的女记者路易莎∙里姆(Louisa Lim)在试图前往夏河的途中被警察成功拦截,接下来她被一辆挂普通车牌的警车跟随了300公里,一直到她到机场为止。另外还有两名法国记者在这一地区经历了同样的事情。美联社的几名摄影记者和文字记者也同样被警察干扰而不能自由工作。一名美国记录片导演斯潘斯∙帕勒莫(Spence Palermo)3月14日被软禁在他在夏河的宾馆房间内以防止他参加藏族的抗议游行。在他提供给CNN的资料中,他说上百名士兵包围了扎布轮寺。几名 BBC的记者则在前往达赖喇嘛出生的村庄采访时被拦截,位于青海的这个小村庄已经被警察团团包围。此外,记者们也没能采访到3月17日发生在北京大学的一次小型的由藏族学生组织的静坐活动,学生们点起了蜡烛。但事后参加的十几名学生都被传讯问话。在西藏,网吧的老板们收到命令要求阻止一切人向外国泄漏发送“国家机密”,尤其是照片和视频资料。手记服务依然没有完全恢复。尽管如此,还是有一些最新的图片被传了出来,无国界记者就收到了一些在拉萨和安多藏族人中枪身亡的图片。西藏的媒体则强烈谴责“达赖喇嘛分裂分子集团”破坏社会稳定,说达赖喇嘛是“披着喇嘛袈裟的狼”,这是一场由西藏党委书记张庆黎在3月19日发起的宣传运动。而藏族主席向巴平错则指责外国媒体的报道不负责任。拉萨电视台则播放骚乱分子的录像,官方新华社则报道说100多名骚乱分子自首。一名上海记者则向我们确认说中国媒体都收到中宣部的命令要求在报道西藏问题时只能用新华社的通稿。骚乱开始以来,外国电台在西藏地区被进一步干扰。据西藏之音的负责人对我们说,中国政府在拉萨周边设置了100多个无线发射站以干扰他们的信号从而阻止人们收听他们的节目。就像我们在2006年发现的一样,中国政府使用与外国电台同样的波段发射中文节目或者是音乐和噪音比如鼓乐和飞机噪音来干扰外国电台的信号。为此,基地在印度的西藏之音电台每天增加了两个小时向西藏发送节目。 Reporters Without Borders is outraged by the methods being used by the Chinese authorities to obstruct foreign journalists trying to cover the situation in the Tibetan regions, and calls for the immediate and unconditional return of the foreign press to Tibet and to nearby provinces with a sizable Tibetan population.At the same time, the jamming of international radio stations has been stepped up in Tibet and Internet café owners are being forced to increase the surveillance of clients, while government propaganda continues to rage at the “Dalai Lama’s clique” and foreign news media.”The Chinese authorities are in the process of dealing with the problem of Tibetan demonstrations by means of force and silence,” Reporters Without Borders said. “After ridding Tibet and the neighbouring regions of undesirable observers – foreign journalists and tourists – the security forces are crushing the protests without the international community being able to watch.”The press freedom organisation added: “For the repression in Tibet to end, the United Nations must demand the return of foreign journalists and the dispatch of independent observers.”Reporters Without Borders has recorded more than 40 serious violations of the rights of foreign journalists since 10 March. They have been prevented from working freely in the cities of Lhasa, Beijing, Chengdu and Xining, as well as in other places in the provinces of Gansu, Sichuan and Qinghai.One of the cases cited by the Foreign Correspondents Club of China is that of a Finnish TV crew that was arrested on 17 March in Xiahe (in Gansu province), where there had been Tibetan demonstrations against the Chinese government. The TV crew was threatened and its video recordings were confiscated despite its protests. “You don’t want to know what will happen if you don’t show us the footage,” one of the policemen told reporter Katri Makkonen.Police forced journalists working for British television channel ITV to leave Xiahe the previous day after stopping them and taking a note of their names several times. They were also filmed by plain-clothes police. ITV correspondent John Ray said their Chinese driver was “terrified” when the police took down the details of his driver’s licence and vehicle licence number.Police in Chengdu (the capital of Sichuan province) prevented journalists working for US television network ABC from filming in a Tibetan district on 16 March. The police told them to keep moving and made them leave in a taxi.Correspondent Louisa Lim of US National Public Radio was turned back at several police checkpoints as she tried to travel to Xiahe. She was then followed for about 300 km by an unmarked police car until she arrived at an airport. At least two French reporters suffered the same fate in this region adjoining Tibet. Several reporters and photographers working for the Associated Press news agency were also prevented from working freely.Spence Palermo, a US documentary filmmaker, was sequestered in his hotel room in Xiahe on 14 March to prevent him from seeing Tibetan protests. In an account he gave to CNN, he said several hundred soldiers were sent to Labrang monastery, where he had just spent several days. BBC reporters were denied access to the village of Taktser in Qinghai province, where the Dalai Lama comes from. The village is surrounded by police,Journalists were also prevented from freely covering a small demonstration held in Beijing University on 17 March by Tibetan students, who lit candles. Dozens of the demonstrators were arrested.In Tibet, Internet café owners have been ordered to prevent all “state secrets,” including photos and videos, from being sent abroad. At the same time, the telephone service is still subject to extensive disruptions. Despite the blackout, some pictures of the recent protests continue to circulate and Reporters Without Borders was able to obtain footage of Tibetans who were shot dead in Lhasa and Amdo.The Tibetan press is relaying violent statements by officials, including comments today by Zhang Qingli, the first secretary of the Communist Party of Tibet, talking of a “death struggle (with) the Dalai clique” and describing the Dalai Lama as “a wolf wrapped in a habit.” Raidi, another Tibetan Communist Party leader, described the foreign press coverage as “outrageous and ill-motivated.”While state-owned Lhasa TV broadcast footage of the “agitators” behind the protests, the official Xinhua news agency reported that more than 100 demonstrators, described as rioters, had surrendered to the authorities. A Shanghai journalist told Reporters Without Borders that the Chinese media have been told by the Propaganda Department to use only Xinhua’s reports about the situation in Tibet.Jamming of international radio stations has increased since the start of the protests. The director of Voice of Tibet, which is based in India, told Reporters Without Borders that the Chinese authorities have stepped up their use of small jamming stations located near cities to prevent the population from hearing of its programmes.As Reporters Without Borders noted in Tibet in 2006, the authorities broadcast Chinese-language programmes and low-pitched noises, such as drumming and aeroplane noises, on the same frequencies as the Tibetan stations based abroad. Voice of Tibet has increased its daily broadcasts by two hours.last_img read more

Iconic Moment Becomes Perfect Rose Bowl Tribute to a Group of Women Champions

first_img Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS More Cool Stuff Community News City fathers and mothers, fans, and members of the 1999 U.S. Women’s World Cup Championship team, gathered at the Rose Bowl Wednesday, 20 years to the day of the crowning, with the unveiling of a commemorative statue.July 10, 1999, was a date the world awoke to the excitement of women’s soccer, when the U.S. defeated China in a penalty kick shootout after a game for the ages ended in a tie. The drama transpired in front of 90,000-plus people; the largest audience to ever view women’s soccer in the U.S.“The City of Pasadena recognizes the importance of the Rose Bowl, not just in the history of Pasadena, but in the history of sports and entertainment,” said Councilwoman Margaret McAustin, kicking things off. “So many iconic moments in sports and entertainment have happened here at America’s Stadium.”“And the event we celebrate here today is at the top of the list.”Taking a moment to recognize the new queens of world soccer, the 2019 U.S. Women’s National Team, McAustin suggested the latest victory would not have been possible were it not for the 1999 win.“The impact of the victory, to sports and to women, cannot be overstated,” said McAustin.The event was emceed by Ann Myers Drysdale, who is in the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame, is an award-winning broadcaster, vice president of the Phoenix Mercury and Phoenix Suns, and wife of late Los Angeles Dodgers legend, Don Drysdale.Myers Drysdale highlighted the fact that, a long history notwithstanding, the statue being dedicated is only the second monument at the Rose Bowl. The other is the only football statue of race-barrier buster Jackie Robinson, which was dedicated in Nov. 2017.“And now we have another first, the first women’s soccer statue here at America’s stadium,” she remarked.Marla Messinger, who led the 1999 U.S. Women’s World Cup Organizing Committee, told the gathering that, “Those women redefined what it meant to be a female athlete. They were educated, articulate, beautiful and as unafraid to be as tough and competitive on the field as they were collegial and engaging off the field.”The star of the show was Brandi Chastain, who scored the winning goal in the shootout. Now a middle-aged mom, with kids in tow, she shared memories of the game, highlighted isolated moments that serve as lessons for young athletes, and generally brought the whole event to life with her vivid recollections.“Being part of the 1999 team meant being challenged everyday to be better,” she recalled. “We weren’t asked for that from our coaches. We asked it of each other and I feel that that type of commitment is what made us as strong as we possibly could have been. We bent sometimes, but we never broke.”She was asked to express the meaning of the statue: “I don’t really know,” Chastain responded. “Just like in 1999, when I stepped up to take that penalty kick. I didn’t know what that day would mean and what the celebration would mean, because I had no idea it was about to happen.”She looked forward, Chastain said, to returning in the coming years with children, family and friends “to celebrate a second monument here at the Rose Bowl.”Chastain was joined at the podium by 1999 team members Lorrie Fair and Saskia Webber with whom she shared the duty of reading off the names of the legendary squad’s members. Anthony DiCicco, son of coach Tony DiCicco who died in 2017, rose to call out his father’s name.Chastain made waves around the world when she took off her top to reveal a sports bra after scoring the goal. “What was I thinking? Insanity,” she explained. “You can’t possibly understand what a childhood dream means until you actually live it.”The statue itself, designed by artist Brian Hanlon, features Chastain, post-goal, in her iconic kneeling position, jersey clutched in two hands. In relief behind her, are teammates and a fraction of the multitude that came to witness history. Every player’s name is etched on the reverse side. Business News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Make a comment Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday center_img HerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyGained Back All The Weight You Lost?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThis Trend Looks Kind Of Cool!HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHere Are Indian Women’s Best Formulas For Eternal BeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeauty Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Community News Top of the News First Heatwave Expected Next Week Photo Gallery Iconic Moment Becomes Perfect Rose Bowl Tribute to a Group of Women Champions By STEPHEN SICILIANO, Managing Editor | Photography by JAMES CARBONE Published on Wednesday, July 10, 2019 | 1:11 pm 102 recommendedShareShareTweetSharePin it Subscribe Your email address will not be published. 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