Riether handed three-match ban

first_img Press Association “Riether was charged by the FA following an incident which occurred in added time of Fulham’s game against Manchester United on Saturday 2 November 2013. The incident, which involved United’s Adnan Januzaj, was not seen by the by the match officials but was caught on video.” Fulham initially queried whether they had to accept the charge and asked for clarification from the FA on its retrospective action rule. Riether, 30, was the first player to be charged by the FA under a new pilot scheme where a panel of three former referees reviews video evidence of incidents not seen by match officials. The full-back apologised for stamping on Januzaj via his official Twitter account on Tuesday, adding: “I will accept the consequences of my actions, and hope to put it behind me when I return.” Despite Riether’s admittance of guilt, it is understood the club did not accept the charge before Tuesday’s 6pm deadline and instead asked for clarification on certain points of the newly-instigated rules that govern when action can be taken. Fulham’s Sascha Riether has been banned for three matches after accepting a Football Association charge of violent conduct for stamping on Manchester United’s Adnan Januzaj.center_img The German defender’s action was not seen by the match officials but was caught on video. An FA statement said: “Following an independent regulatory commission hearing today, Fulham’s Sascha Riether has been suspended for three matches with immediate effect after he accepted an FA charge for violent conduct. last_img read more

THOROUGHBRED CLASSIC SHOW MARCH 25 AND 26; CLASS ENTRIES FILLING FAST

first_imgHeadlining the weekend are the enormously popular $1,500 Hunter Derby, $1,500 Jumper Stakes, $1,500 Event Challenge and $1,000 Dressage Challenge, which everyone looks forward to either riding in or watching. Class lists and fees are available at ThoroughbredClassic.org , and can be viewed online or downloaded. Additionally, quick entry links can be found at Horseshowtime.com . Classes are filling fast, so prospective participants are encouraged to enter as soon as possible. This year’s judging panel will include several top names in the equestrian community, including world-renowned San Diego-based hunter/jumper trainer and clinician James Waldman, who will oversee the hunter ring. Arcadia, CA, March 9, 2017 – Final preparations are underway for the 10th installment of the popular Thoroughbred Classic Horse Show (TCHS), set for March 25 and 26 at Galway Downs near Temecula, CA. Sponsored by the Siegel CARMA (California Retirement Management Account) Foundation, the two-day event is open to all registered Thoroughbreds and offers classes in just about every equine discipline, from hunters and jumpers, to dressage, western and gymkhana. The class, Mandella explains, is something she hopes will lead to more OTTB adoptions. “I can’t think of a better way to showcase the potential of an OTTB,” Mandella said. “It really is another way for these horses to prove what they’re capable of and I’m excited to see the future stars of our Thoroughbred Classics in this class and even more excited to see these horses find their forever homes.”center_img Since its inception in 2013, thousands of OTTBs have participated in the many Thoroughbred Classic shows hosted all over Southern California, from rescues and lower end claimers to grade 1-winning millionaires, a true testament to the versatility of a Thoroughbred and to the loving people who guide them in their second careers. Additionally, this year a special class has been created which is open to all Thoroughbreds available for sale or adoption. The non-judged and free-formatted presentation is designed to showcase the horse to potential new owners. Options for disciplines include jumping, dressage, pole bending, barrels and trail obstacles. Pertinent information about each horse will be read by the ring announcers and the $25 class fee will be waived for all CARMA Aftercare Partners. “Galway is a unique facility that allows us to offer something for everyone,” CARMA Executive Director Lucinda Mandella said. “We can utilize the grass ring for the jumpers and excellent sand rings for hunters, dressage and western disciplines. Mostly notably, our OTTBs and their riders have the opportunity to compete on a CCI3*cross-country course. (California Retirement Management Account (CARMA) is a 501c3 non-profit organization founded in 2007 to raise money for retired racehorses. It is responsible for hosting fundraising events, educating owners and trainers on equine retirement, raising awareness and working to unify the racing industry in support of its equine athletes. Ways in which this is accomplished include facilitating the transition of racehorses off the track through its Placement Program and showcasing the breed’s versatility as equestrian mounts at its Thoroughbred Classic Horse Show.)last_img read more

Jazz boost NBA playoff bid with key win over Suns

first_imgTom Brady most dominant player in AFC championship history Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Rogue cops marked as Gamboa’s targets in his appointment as PNP chief Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title Eugenie Bouchard’s bid for Australian Open spot ends in qualifying Heated 2nd half run propels Miami to romp of Pistons MOST READ Japeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for Ginebra Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. “Our bigs have been solid all year long and they raised their level,” Jazz coach Quin Snyder said. “A good night for those guys.”Utah went ahead by 14 early in the third quarter, but the Suns put together a 12-2 run to make it 59-55 with 8:29 to go.The crowd was buzzing even two possessions after Phoenix big man Richaun Holmes threw down a windmill dunk with his left hand with 3:39 to go in the third, cutting the Jazz lead to 72-66.A pair of free throws by Booker tied it at 75 with 30 seconds left. Joe Ingles hit a 3 out of the corner for a 78-75 lead for the Jazz at the end of three quarters.“We have to move forward. We have had a pretty good stretch here in previous games and you have to keep building on that,” Booker said. “You are going to have lumps in the road but you’ve got to keep going and punch the clock every day.”PENNY FOR YOUR THOUGHTSSnyder was asked before the game about the recent incident in Salt Lake City involving Thunder star Russell Westbrook and comments from a fan in the stands. The fan was banned from attending events at Vivint Smart Home Arena.“Anytime you have an incident that is unfortunate, you hope that there can be a catalyst for positive change,” Snyder said.T’D UPOubre was whistled for a technical foul for shouting at an official as he walked to the bench with blood trickling out of his nose just before halftime. Mitchell scored 16 of his 26 points in the second half and Derrick Favors added 18 for Utah. Rudy Gobert had 18 points and 20 rebounds as the Jazz ended a two-game skid and pulled into a tie with the Los Angeles Clippers for the seventh seed in the West.Utah dominated on the boards, outrebounding Phoenix 52-35.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissSPORTSCoronation night?SPORTSThirdy Ravena gets‍‍‍ offers from Asia, Australian ball clubs“The goal is just to find our rhythm and keep getting better,” Gobert said. “Guys did a great job boxing out their man, and when you do that you get a lot of rebounds. It’s more about our defense.”Devin Booker’s 27 points led the Suns, who came back from 14 down in the third quarter to tie the score but couldn’t push past the Jazz in the fourth. Kelly Oubre Jr. added 18 points and Tyler Johnson had 15 for the last-place Suns, who had won four of five.center_img Utah led by 21 in the fourth quarter, pulling away after Phoenix tied it at 75 late in the third. Mitchell hit a 3-pointer with 2:57 left to make it 105-89.Ricky Rubio returned to the Jazz after missing two games with left hip tightness. He played 22 minutes and had six points and four assists.All three of Gobert’s field goals in the first quarter were dunks, and with 52 seconds left in the period he delivered a look-away bounce pass to Jae Crowder for a layup.The Suns led by four in the second, but the Jazz surged ahead with a 9-0 run. Another dunk by Gobert off a lob from Rubio made it 48-41 with 1:54 left in the first half.Mitchell’s 3 with 21 seconds remaining made it 53-41, and the Jazz led by 10 at halftime. Gobert had 12 points and 10 rebounds in the first half.ADVERTISEMENT Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award LATEST STORIES Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? TIP-INSJazz: Improved to 8-4 in the first of back-to-back games this season. … The first basket of the game for the Jazz came when Mitchell drove across the lane and delivered a no-look bounce pass to Favors for a dunk. … G Raul Neto entered in the second quarter, his first game since Feb. 27 because of hamstring tightness. He played 11 minutes.Suns: Recalled rookie guard Elie Okobo from Northern Arizona of the G-League. … Head coach Igor Kokoskov was on Snyder’s staff at Missouri in 1999-2000, and with the Jazz from 2015-18. … The Suns have lost five straight to the Jazz overall, and play Utah twice more this season.UP NEXTJazz: Return home to host Minnesota on Thursday night.Suns: At the Houston Rockets on Friday night.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) drives as Phoenix Suns center Deandre Ayton defends during the first half of an NBA basketball game Wednesday, March 13, 2019, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Matt York)PHOENIX — Donovan Mitchell knows his team is in good position as it pursues a Western Conference playoff spot. He just wasn’t sure exactly where the Utah Jazz were in the standings, until right before Wednesday night’s game.“I really don’t pay attention to that stuff this time of year,” Mitchell said after leading the Jazz to a 114-97 win over the Phoenix Suns. “I try my best not to, because it allows you to get all distracted. We just want to focus on game to game.”ADVERTISEMENT View commentslast_img read more

Treacherous snowfall hits north plains

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! BILLINGS, Mont. – Portions of Montana, the Dakotas and Wyoming were hit by a slow-moving snowstorm that knocked out power, closed roads and dumped up to 2 feet of snow by Wednesday night. Thousands of power outages were reported and some schools were closed by the storm, which began Tuesday. Drifting snow contributed to road closings, and the National Guard was called out in North Dakota to aid the Highway Patrol in rescuing stranded motorists. By nightfall, hundreds of people in vehicles, including three buses, had been rescued with equipment ranging from snow plows to bulldozers, said Rick Robinson of the state Department of Emergency Services. There were no reports of injuries. “It’s really treacherous – heavy, deep snow. Visibility is just really poor. It’s so heavy that vehicles just can’t push through it,” North Dakota Highway Patrol Capt. Mark Bethke said. As much as 11 inches of snow had fallen in southeastern Montana by Wednesday morning. Billings had received 10.8 inches and set a record for snowfall Tuesday with 9.9 inches, National Weather Service meteorologist Tom Humphrey said. last_img read more

The big thing that must happen if the Warriors are to come back from a 3-1 deficit

first_imgThrough the first four games of these NBA Finals, Toronto’s defense has … TORONTO — The Splash Brothers can’t do it alone.Not down 3-1. Not against this Raptors team.So as the Warriors head into Game 5 looking to win the first of three consecutive games necessary to claim the title, the big question amongst many is “who will be the third member of a Big Three?”Because if the Warriors don’t get that third scorer to show himself in Game 5, there won’t be a third-straight title.last_img

Dinos Found in Spain, Croatia

first_imgDinosaur fossils continue to be discovered around the world.  The BBC news hints that surprises may be forthcoming from a new cache in Spain that has yielded stegosaurs, crocodilians and carnivorous dinosaurs, and a pelvic bone possibly from Diplodocus.  On a resort island of Croatia, trackways of titanosaurs have been discovered, reports EurekAlert.  The BBC is celebrating the bicentenary of the British scientist who gave us the word dinosaur, Sir Richard Owen; see Taipei Times story.Richard Owen was a strident opponent of Charles Darwin, and had more credibility than Darwin in 1859.  Same could be said of Adam Sedgwick, the man who taught Darwin geology.  Darwin was deeply hurt that these two eminent scientists rejected his theory, but his four musketeers (see 01/06/2004 headline) saw to it that their bearded buddha got elevated to the pantheon anyway (see 02/13/2004 commentary).(Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Small Creatures Have Super Strength

first_imgThe most amazing physical feats in nature are performed by some of the smallest organisms.Super-cockroach: Scientists put some cockroaches through a squeeze test and were astonished. Look what they say in PNAS:Cockroaches intrude everywhere by exploiting their soft-bodied, shape-changing ability. We discovered that cockroaches traversed horizontal crevices smaller than a quarter of their height in less than a second by compressing their bodies’ compliant exoskeletons in half. Once inside vertically confined spaces, cockroaches still locomoted rapidly at 20 body lengths per second using an unexplored mode of locomotion—body-friction legged crawling. Using materials tests, we found that the compressive forces cockroaches experience when traversing the smallest crevices were 300 times body weight. Cockroaches withstood forces nearly 900 times body weight without injury, explaining their robustness to compression.Now you understand why they are so hard to fight in the kitchen. The scientists, though, got excited about what they learned: Cockroach exoskeletons provided inspiration for a soft, legged search-and-rescue robot that may penetrate rubble generated by tornados, earthquakes, or explosions.” Science Daily shares more about cockroaches and the bio-inspiration they provide. Live Science shows a video of the compressive material (warning: annoying music).Super diatom: How can a little microbe win the gold for strength? It’s incredible. In another paper in PNAS, a team found the following:Diatoms are unicellular algae that form an intricate silica cell wall. A protective shell that is light enough to prevent sinking while simultaneously offering strength against predators is of interest to the design of lightweight structural materials. Using three-point bending experiments, we show that the diatom shell has the highest specific strength of all previously reported biological materials. Fracture analysis and finite element simulations also suggest functional differentiation between the shell layers and features to mitigate fracture. These results demonstrate the natural development of architecture in live organisms to simultaneously achieve light weight, strength, and structural integrity and may provide insight into evolutionary design.While “evolutionary design” is a sophoxymoronic phrase, it’s incredible to think about the physics of this little glass structure in which a soft little alga lives. Ounce for ounce, the diatom wins over bones, teeth and antlers, PhysOrg says. The secret is a honeycomb-like pattern of holes that provides strength while allowing nutrients in and waste out.“Silica is a strong but brittle material. For example, when you drop a piece of glass, it shatters,” says Greer. “But architecting this material into the complex design of these diatom shells actually creates a structure that is resilient against damage. The presence of the holes delocalizes the concentrations of stress on the structure.”Again, these scientists see possibilities from what they learned about diatom design. “The group plans to use design principles from diatoms to create resilient, bioinspired artificial structures,” PhysOrg says.Update 2/11/16: Boxing Ants: Science Daily tells how American biologists watched ants strike each other’s antennae to determine rank in the colony. “Trap-jaw ants are the fastest boxers ever recorded,” they commented. Muhammed Ali had nothing on these champs. “The speeds ranged from 19.5 strikes per second for Odontomachus rixosus, hailing from Cambodia, to a blazing-fast 41.5 strikes per second for Odontomachus brunneus, native to Florida, the researchers found.” Winners get to go out and forage; the weaklings had to stay inside the nest.Why would evolution confer such design on a tiny diatom? When would it ever encounter forces needing that kind of super-strength? And why would evolution design each diatom shell as a geometric shape on which is carved intricate patterns?In his new book Evolution: Still a Theory in Crisis, Dr. Michael Denton brings his influential 1985 classic up to date after 30 years of thinking about Darwinism. He focuses heavily on “non-adaptive design” that could never come about by natural selection. Surely these examples qualify for that designation. (Visited 57 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Does ISIS Evolve?

first_img(Visited 38 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 This may be the winning candidate for worst Darwinian just-so story of the decade.You have to hand it to evolutionists; at least they are consistent. If everything evolves, then everything evolves. Makes perfect sense. But a corollary is that there is no such thing as an ideology. Human beings are mere pawns of evolutionary forces that use them to play “games” (according to the game-theoretic version of Darwinian evolution).One of the most extreme examples of applying Darwinian theory to everything can be seen in a new paper by 10 academics from the University of Florida and Harvard University about “online ecology” including “ISIS and beyond”. To them, the Islamic State evolves like any other biological ecosystem. Published in Science, this paper utilizes the terminology one would expect in a paper about the Darwinian evolution of a forest community or a population of predators and prey in the soil.Support for an extremist entity such as Islamic State (ISIS) somehow manages to survive globally online despite considerable external pressure and may ultimately inspire acts by individuals having no history of extremism, membership in a terrorist faction, or direct links to leadership. Examining longitudinal records of online activity, we uncovered an ecology evolving on a daily time scale that drives online support, and we provide a mathematical theory that describes it. The ecology features self-organized aggregates (ad hoc groups formed via linkage to a Facebook page or analog) that proliferate preceding the onset of recent real-world campaigns and adopt novel adaptive mechanisms to enhance their survival. One of the predictions is that development of large, potentially potent pro-ISIS aggregates can be thwarted by targeting smaller ones.As justification for this Darwinian view of a radical religious movement, the authors believe they can identify ways to thwart its spread. But their analysis completely depersonalizes the movement, ridding it of any ideological, theological, or moral underpinnings. The terrorists become nothing but pawns of impersonal forces adapting to the environment.The authors do not use “natural selection” or “phylogeny” language, but do rely heavily on “evolutionary adaptations” and “survival” concepts, e.g.:These observations open up the possibility to add evolutionary game theoretic features into our systems-level theory to explain the multiple use of particular adaptations by particular aggregates and their decision of when to adapt. A future generalized theory could prove possible, employing game theoretic ideas from (26), for example.Ref. 26 is to Martin Nowak’s 2006 book, Evolutionary Dynamics: Exploring the Equations of Life. The description on Amazon.com does refer to natural selection:At a time of unprecedented expansion in the life sciences, evolution is the one theory that transcends all of biology. Any observation of a living system must ultimately be interpreted in the context of its evolution. Evolutionary change is the consequence of mutation and natural selection, which are two concepts that can be described by mathematical equations. Evolutionary Dynamics is concerned with these equations of life.Clearly, these scientists treat ISIS as a mere “aggregate” that “adapts” by variation and selection according to a model. Is that the best way to understand a terror movement? The editors of Science give it their blessing, not only by publishing it, but by adopting their terminology about the “evolution of such aggregates“. What none of the scientists or editors seem to realize is that the same thinking could be applied to scientists themselves. What happens if scientific research is viewed in Darwinian terms? Are members of the scientific community in an aggregate that adapts to the environment by impersonal processes describable by equations? If so, then the “scientific aggregate” has no claims to truth—including this paper and the journal that published it.Media Buy-InAt Live Science, Kacey Deamer bought into this notion in her article, “ISIS Plays ‘Evolutionary Game’ to Avoid Online Shutdown.” Is that it? Is it just a game? Deamer goes one step further in self-refuting nonsense, when she lets lead author Neil Johnson turn the Americans into the predators:“It’s a little bit like fish when they form shoals and the shoals merge and break up, and when a predator comes in they scatter and then they reform,” Johnson said. “But they tend not to reform around where the predator was. They’ll go off into different corners and gradually build up again.“It’s not too dissimilar,” he added, “But, of course, now it’s on the internet.”Are readers supposed to view ISIS terrorists who chop off heads and drop their enemies into vats of acid as nothing more than little fish who scatter when a predator approaches? Who are the good guys here? This portrayal almost makes one sympathetic to the terrorists, as if everything was peaceful and pastoral till the American drones appeared overhead.Return to Reason?John Bohannon usually has a wiser outlook among Science commentators, so let’s see what he says about this in his piece, “How to attack the Islamic State online.” He begins by sharing the data-gathering work by Yulia Vorobyeva (University of Florida), a co-author of the paper. She spent a lot of time combing through the chilling, bloody messages from ISIS on social media, where many of the victims are children. She found, to her surprise, that nearly 40% of pro-IS participants were women. “Given the often harsh treatment of women endorsed by the terrorist organization,” that was startling, he says. “Vorobyeva’s harrowing exercise in data-gathering has helped her understand how IS wages an online war of propaganda.” So far so good: it’s about ideology; it’s about propaganda; it’s about intentional action. No evolution here. Ideas matter. Bohannon proceeds to investigate how the data she gathered in her “gruesome” task might help allies stop the spread of ISIS terror through their “ideas and information” shared online.Unlike the evolutionists, Bohannon writes like a reporter watching an intelligence agency evaluate a threat based on real-time data and intelligence gathering, using analytical tools. He only uses the e-word evolution once in passing—”the growth and evolution of the online networks that supply the terrorist group with converts and support”—a reference that might be forgiven if he defines evolution here as mere “unfolding change over time” presumably by freely-acting individuals. So yes, in a sense, warfare is a game, and enemies’ strategies evolve. That’s why countries practice war games. But if “Evolution” is the gamer, and human beings are mere pawns in a mindless game, then the bottom drops out of all efforts at explaining an evil like ISIS.None of the three articles mentioned evil, morality, or design. The Science articles only mentioned Islam within the phrase “Islamic State”; Live Science didn’t mention Islam at all.Free Your WillIf humans are pawns of evolutionary games, they have no free will. The late Cornell evolutionist Dr. William Provine used to emphasize that. Whatever the “Association for Psychological Science” thinks about the question, they have the sense to realize that things go better with free will. Science Daily writes, “When it comes to knowing your true self, believe in free will.” The irony of that headline appears lost on its author.“Whether you agree that we have free will or that we are overpowered by social influence or other forms of determinism, the belief in free will has truly important consequences,” says lead author Elizabeth Seto, a Graduate Student at the Department of Psychology at Texas A&M University.Previous studies have shown that minimizing belief in free will can increase cheating, aggression, and conformity and decrease feelings of gratitude.Other research indicates that feeling alienated from one’s true self is associated with increased anxiety, depression and decision dissatisfaction. On the other hand, knowing one’s true self positively influences self-esteem and one’s sense of meaning in life.Another psychological survey was done (you know, the kind that is usually hard to replicate). Dr. Elizabeth Seto (Texas A&M) could only offer pragmatic reasons for choosing to believe in free will (if you can pardon the irony again):“When we experience or have low belief in free will and feel ‘out of touch’ with who we are, we may behave without a sense of morality,” says Seto. “This is particularly important if we have a goal to improve the quality of life for individuals and the society at large.”So is this a call to faith? It seems intuitive that one cannot have a goal to improve without presupposing the belief in free will. Else, how can an individual do otherwise, and why would Seto encourage people to believe in free will?Update 6/21/16: Sheryl Prentice (U of Lancaster) on The Conversation offers a design-based approach for using technology to predict terrorist attacks. There is no mention of evolution in her article, which relies on finding patterns and using human “experience, values and judgement” to predict which individuals are “intending to carry out an attack.” Her approach stands in stark contrast to the evolutionary model.The absurd lengths to which secular evolutionists apply their theory make us wag our heads in disbelief. This takes the cake: ISIS evolves by mutation and natural selection! Well, then, we might as well throw down our arms and watch in helpless horror as this cancer spreads. If they win, they prove themselves the fittest. Their first act as the fittest in the evolutionary game is to declare Darwinism illegal and punishable by death. Short circuit!Is there nobody in secular media and Big Science who sees the inherent contradictions? This is so easy; we do it all the time. Just apply their assumptions back on themselves, and watch their ideas implode. It’s a law of nature that no idea that implodes is sustainable. Simple logic. Why is this so hard?We have no quarrel with intelligence gathering on network activity that helps morally righteous people fight ISIS with wisdom and strategy. ISIS is committing genocide. They crucify Christians, a horror unheard of since the Roman Empire. They drop other Muslims into vats of acid. They take little girls as sex slaves. They bomb marathons. They shoot up nightclubs. They use chemical weapons. If ever there was a righteous cause for just war, this is it! Those who care about righteousness must use intelligent design to stop a great evil. Intelligent design can (and should) include sophisticated technology and mathematical models.What we don’t need is evolutionary theory! ISIS has nothing to do with mutation, selection, or game-theoretic ecology. For love of God and country, get the Darwiniacs out of the State Department before we all die.last_img read more