Longer Looks AIDS Epidemic In The US How Public Health and the

first_imgEvery week KHN reporter Marissa Evans finds interesting reads from around the Web.The New Republic: Why Did AIDS Ravage The U.S. More Than Any Other Developed Country?I pull out my phone and check the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website, which tells me that, in the United States, 636,000 people have died since the epidemic began. That’s 23 times higher than Germany, for a country with four times the population. This makes no sense. Germany has big cities, it has gay men and sex workers and drug users, it has all the same temptations for them to be uncareful that the United States does. How could so many fewer people have died? (Michael Hobbes, 5/12).The Atlantic: What the U.S. Can Learn From Brazil’s Health Care MessBy a lot of measures, Brazil’s Sistema Único de Saúde — or SUS — has led to huge health gains. The country now has an infant mortality rate of about 13 per 1,000 live births, down from about 27 in 2000. Maternal mortality has also been cut in half since 1990. The average Brazilian only lived to about 66 in 1990; today, life expectancy is at a respectable 74. But take a closer look, and the system seems more like “a safety net with holes,” as one Brazilian doctor put it to me (Olga Khazan, 5/8).Life Hacker: Why There’s So Much Confusion Over Health And NutritionIf you believed the internet, you’d think there’s huge debate over whether eggs, coffee, or salt are good or bad for you. In reality, there’s significant agreement on diet and health issues among experts, but the general public is conflicted. So why are we so confused when experts agree? Let’s clear the air (Alan Henry, 5/7).Harvard Public Health: Failing Economy, Failing HealthFive years after the Great Recession officially came to an end, the United States has yet to fully recover from the economic devastation sparked by the collapse of an $8 trillion housing bubble and the ensuing turmoil that saw global financial systems teetering on the brink of collapse. But while the economic costs of the downturn have drawn the lion’s share of attention, the damage to our bodies could end up far surpassing the damage to our bank accounts. “It’s quite stunning we haven’t been hearing more about this,” says Kasisomayajula “Vish” Viswanath, professor of health communication at Harvard School of Public Health. “We talk about poverty and inequality resulting from the recession, but we do not take the next step. We do not extend that logic to the effects on health” (Amy Gutman, 5/9).USA Today: The Cost Of Not Caring: Nowhere To GoHundreds of thousands of people with serious mental illness are falling through the cracks of a mental health system in tatters, a USA TODAY special report shows. Mentally ill Americans who have nowhere to go and find little sympathy from those around them often tumble into a de facto mental health system, made up of emergency rooms, county jails and city streets. The lucky ones find homes with family. The unlucky ones show up in the morgue. “We have replaced the hospital bed with the jail cell, the homeless shelter and the coffin,” says Rep. Tim Murphy, R-Pa., a child psychologist leading an effort to remodel the mental health system. “How is that compassionate?” States looking to save money have pared away both the community mental health services designed to keep people healthy, as well as the hospital care needed to help them heal after a crisis (Liz Szabo, 5/12).NPR: ‘Good Doctor’ Puts Past Medical Practices Under An Ethical MicroscopeDr. Barron Lerner is a doctor and the son of a doctor. He grew up thinking his father was a wonderful, gifted and caring physician, which he was. But after Lerner started studying bioethics, he began questioning some of his father’s practices — practices which were typical of many doctors in the ’60s. There were times when his father would conceal information from his patient if he thought that was in the patient’s best interest; there were times he didn’t reveal that a patient’s cancer was terminal; there were times, in the era before do-not-resuscitate orders, that his father would make that decision for a patient without consulting the family. This kind of paternalism would be considered a breach of ethics now (5/13). The New York Times: Living With Cancer: Careless CareWhen I consider what happened to an esteemed friend and colleague, I fume at the mayhem that ovarian cancer wreaks and at the deficient care she received at a university hospital in another town. Do instances of medical negligence sometimes go unnoticed because patients are so debilitated that they cannot testify — especially if they are still in treatment? (Susan Gubar, 5/8). This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. Longer Looks: AIDS Epidemic In The U.S.; How Public Health and the Recession Connectlast_img read more

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White House Seeking 618 Billion For AntiEbola Efforts

first_img Politico: DoD To Deploy Fewer Troops In Ebola Fight Politico: Ebola Money Fight An Early Lame-Duck Test The White House is seeking $6.18 billion to cope with the crisis — an early post-election test of whether the two political parties can work together on a health issue that has known no ideology. And Wednesday’s hearing before the Senate Appropriations Committee amounted to a full court press to quickly attach the emergency funds to a year-end spending bill to keep the government funded through September 2015. (Rogers, 11/12) White House Seeking $6.18 Billion For Anti-Ebola Efforts Politico reports that the push for new funding is viewed as a post-election test to see if the two parties can work together on a health issue. Politico also reports that the military is now on track to send about 3,000 troops — down from 4,000 — to fight Ebola in West Africa. center_img The Pentagon is sending about 1,000 fewer troops to fight Ebola in West Africa than it previously planned, officials said Wednesday. The military is now on track to deploy about only 3,000 troops, down from the previous estimate of 4,000 or more, said Maj. Gen. Gary Volesky, commander of the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), who was among the U.S. officials who briefed reporters at the Pentagon via satellite. (Ewing, 11/12) This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more

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Reality Check For Red States Conservative Ideas For Medicaid Arent All Getting

first_img Politico Pro: White House Cutback Plan Hinges On Kids’ Health Insurance Reality Check For Red States: Conservative Ideas For Medicaid Aren’t All Getting A Free Pass From CMS While CMS has been encouraging states to request waivers from some federal restrictions on their Medicaid program, recent decisions by CMS Administrator Seema Verma indicate that not every plan will get a green light. Meanwhile, the White House’s rescissions plan faces a make-or-break moment on Tuesday. And Medicaid news comes out of Virginia and Iowa, as well. The stage is set for a showdown in the Virginia Senate on Tuesday over a budget compromise negotiated by Senate Finance Co-Chairman Emmett Hanger, R-Augusta, and House Appropriations Chairman Chris Jones, R-Suffolk, to expand the state’s Medicaid program and pay for the state’s share through a new tax on hospital revenues that also would boost Medicaid payments for inpatient provider care. The proposal, hammered out over almost a week of negotiations between Hanger and Jones, also would bank an expected $500 million revenue windfall to boost Virginia’s reserve funds to almost $1 billion. (Martz, 5/21) This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. Iowa has picked one of the country’s largest health-care companies to help run its Medicaid program. The Iowa Department of Human Services announced Monday that a subsidiary of Centene will replace AmeriHealth Caritas, starting in July 2019. AmeriHealth decided to leave the state last fall, after losing hundreds of millions of dollars covering care for more than 200,000 poor or disabled Iowans on Medicaid. (Leys, 5/21) Richmond Times-Dispatch: Hanger, Jones Agree On Budget Compromise To Expand Medicaid In Va., Boost Reserves And Provide Raises For Teachers, State Employees Top Republican lawmakers in Virginia unveiled a new budget proposal Monday that will expand Medicaid, give state workers raises and boost the state’s rainy-day fund. Sen. Emmett Hanger and Del. Chris Jones said they’d hammered out a compromise spending plan they hope will have the support of a majority in both chambers of the General Assembly. The plan will face its first big hurdle Tuesday when the Senate reconvenes. Republican Senate leaders oppose Medicaid expansion and could try to block the proposed spending plan. (Suderman, 5/21) Red states are getting a reality check from the Trump administration in just how conservative they can remake their Medicaid programs. Earlier this month, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) rejected a request from Kansas to limit Medicaid eligibility to just three years. CMS Administrator Seema Verma followed up on the Kansas decision by saying the administration will not allow any states to impose lifetime limits on Medicaid. (Weixel, 5/22) center_img The Hill: Red States Find There’s No Free Pass On Medicaid Changes From Trump Des Moines Register: Centene To Replace AmeriHealth As Iowa Medicaid Manager The vast majority of likely Democratic primary voters say cuts to education spending, inadequate and unaffordable health care, and inadequate mental health facilities are major threats to Iowa’s future, according to a new Des Moines Register/Mediacom Iowa Poll. Other issues that worry a majority of these governor’s race primary voters: privatized Medicaid, restrictions on abortion, water quality, a lack of well-paying jobs and inadequate spending on infrastructure. (Petroski, 5/21) Des Moines Register: Iowa Poll: Education, Health Care, Mental Health Worry Dem Primary Voters The Associated Press: Virginia Leaders Propose Spending Plan That Expands Medicaid It’s nearly judgment day for the White House’s ambitious package of spending cuts. Republicans on Capitol Hill will be handed a decision Tuesday that could seal the fate of the Trump administration’s plan to claw back $15.3 billion in unspent federal money. The Government Accountability Office will formally weigh in on whether the White House’s package of rescissions, H.R. 3 (115), follows strict budget rules in Congress — and whether it will be able to bypass the Senate’s filibuster. (Ferris, 5/21) last_img read more

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State Highlights One Of NYCs Top Public Health Officials Looks For A

first_img The 12 hospitals in the Partners Health care system have regained access to the medical records network after the state’s largest health care provider resolved a technical problem, a Partners Health Care system spokesman said Monday around 9:15 a.m. The medical records network was down for hours Monday, forcing the cancellation of a “small number” of non-urgent surgical procedures and delays in some other appointments, said Partners spokesman Rich Copp. (Ellement, 2/11) The map of the United States shows four blue dots clustered in northern Georgia. They represent the metro Atlanta counties of Fulton, DeKalb, Gwinnett and Cobb.It’s not exactly surprising that the four — the most populous in our state — are among 48 counties in the nation that the Trump administration is targeting for its plan to stop the spread of HIV. (Miller, 2/11) The Wall Street Journal: A Year After Parkland: Making Sure To Say, ‘I Love You’ At Morning Drop-Off Georgia Health News: In New Offensive Against HIV, Metro Atlanta Is A Battleground Tampa Bay Times: All Children’s Says 13 Heart Surgery Patients Were Hurt By Care Oxiris Barbot is waiting patiently to hold the baby. A pediatrician, Dr. Barbot is visiting an East New York apartment on a recent morning to observe a staff member as she counsels a postpartum mother on breast-feeding, safe sleeping practices and general pediatric care. This home-visit program is one of hundreds offered by the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, which Dr. Barbot now leads as its commissioner. Hers is one of the highest-profile jobs in the public health field. (West, 2/11) State Highlights: One Of NYC’s Top Public Health Officials Looks For ‘A Different Way Of Doing Business’; Texas Bogged Down With Massive Backlog Of Patients Requesting Balance Billing Mediation Media outlets report on news from New York, Texas, Florida, Massachusetts, Wyoming, California, Arizona, Minnesota, Iowa, Maryland and Georgia. The Star Tribune: Blue Cross Blue Shield Parent Diversifies With Asset Management Texas Tribune: Texas Mediation For Balance Billing Faces Massive Backlog San Francisco Chronicle: Sen. Wiener To Introduce California Bill Protecting Victimized Sex Workers Thousands of Texans seeking government help with surprise medical bills were hit with another shock last year: a clogged-up consumer protection bureaucracy. A massive backlog that began last summer left state regulators unable to provide timely help to the thousands of Texans who requested mediation from the Texas Department of Insurance. (Root and Najmabadi, 2/12) A pair of private equity firms have officially acquired Watertown health information technology firm athenahealth.The company said Monday that the $5.7 billion transaction announced late last year is complete. Athenahealth is now a private company owned by Veritas Capital and Evergreen Coast Capital, an arm of the activist hedge fund Elliott Management. (Rosen, 2/11) An internal review by Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital has found more than a dozen incidents in which children in the hospital’s heart unit were harmed by the care they received. The cases should have been immediately reported to state officials, the hospital’s interim president told employees during private town halls this week. None were reported until recently. The hospital’s former leaders also didn’t properly notify the board of trustees about safety concerns in the heart surgery department. That led to the federal government’s recent declaration that All Children’s had left patients in danger, the interim president said. (McGrory and Bedi, 2/9) Boston Globe: Partners Health Care Hospitals Up And Running After Suffering Network Issue The Baltimore Sun: Former Military Hospital In Baltimore Near Hopkins Campus To Get New Life As Academic Center  Boston Globe: It’s Official: Athenahealth Is Now Owned By Two Private Equity Firms Johns Hopkins University now plans to make over a 1930s-era hospital building on the edge of its Homewood campus that was originally established by Congress to care for sick and disabled seamen for academic purposes. The building, originally the 290-bed Baltimore Marine Hospital, has served many public, private, university purposes over the decades. It was marked for demolition at one point to make way for several Hopkins health system buildings, but university officials now say they plan to keep the structure. (Cohn, 2/12) Beginning this week, agencies that help get food to hungry Iowans are expanding their services. The Des Moines area’s DMARC Mobile Food Pantry will add four more stops to its schedule, which will provide a healthy, three-day supply of food to some people who haven’t been able to get it from other food pantry locations. (Mayer, 2/11) center_img The Arizona Department of Health Services, along with the state medical and nursing boards, have opened investigations into what may have gone wrong in a hospital “patient dumping” case revealed by The Arizona Republic. Martin, a mentally impaired man who had been missing for months, was found at a bus stop with an amputated foot, The Republic reported in January. (Sanders, 2/11) Workers who manage assets at Eagan-based Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota look after a portfolio of investments and holdings with a value of roughly $1.6 billion. Over the past 12 months, Blue Cross officials have decided to try leveraging this expertise by creating a business called Aware Asset Management, a federally registered investment adviser that large companies including other insurers can hire for help with managing investments. (Snowbeck, 2/11) The Wall Street Journal: As A Doctor She Treated Children, Now Health Commissioner Cares For An Entire City KQED: California’s First Surgeon General Takes Aim At ‘Toxic Stress’ California Sen. Scott Wiener, D-San Francisco, will introduce legislation Monday that would prevent law enforcement from arresting and charging sex workers who come forward as victims or witnesses to serious crimes. The proposed law, SB233, would also prevent officers from using condoms as probable cause to arrest a sex worker in any situation. (Sernoffsky, 2/11) Wyoming Public Radio: Conversion Therapy Remains Legal Across Most Of Region As baby boomers head into retirement, and many young people move away in search of opportunity, Maine is one of only two states, along with West Virginia, where deaths now outnumber births. That gulf is reshaping life here in myriad ways, from shrinking the workforce to intensifying the demand for services for the elderly, and it will only widen in the coming years, demographers predict. (MacQuarrie, 2/11) Iowa Public Radio: Iowa Food Pantries Increasing Mobile Stops, Services Arizona Republic: Arizona Investigates Case Of Man Found At Bus Stop With Amputated Foot Boston Globe: In Maine Deaths Outnumber Births, And The State Is Grappling With What To Do Atlanta Journal-Constitution: Kemp Backs School Mental Health Program In Georgia Budget Gov. Brian Kemp visited a pair of schools Monday to shine a spotlight on a new initiative tucked into his state budget proposal aimed at addressing mental health problems at Georgia schools. The spending plan steers an extra $8.4 million to the Apex program, an organization that the Kemp administration views as crucial to identifying and counseling troubled students while also targeting issues that health experts say could threaten school safety. (Bluestein, 2/11) California has never had a surgeon general, but that will change today. Dr. Nadine Burke Harris, a San Francisco-based pediatrician, has pioneered research into the effect that childhood traumas have on health. As the state’s top doctor, Burke Harris will act in an advisory capacity to Gov. Gavin Newsom. (Orr, 2/11) Conversion therapy for LGBTQ youth remains legal across most of the country, and much of our region. But right now, Colorado is considering a statewide ban on the practice. It includes various kinds of treatments intended to change a person’s sexual orientation or gender identity. (Mullen, 2/11) The horror of the shooting here nearly a year ago that left 17 people dead crosses Ina Berlingeri-Vincenty’s mind every morning when she drops her son Nico off at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Before he gets out of the car, she says, “I make sure I say, ‘I love you.’” (Campo-Flores, 2/12) This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more

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Canadas economy grows faster than expected

first_img ← Previous Next → advertisement More Canada’s economy grows faster than expected Led by growth in manufacturing, finance and insurance, and wholesale trade Reddit 0 Comments Twitter Comment December 21, 20188:59 AM ESTLast UpdatedDecember 21, 20189:05 AM EST Filed under News Economy Statistics Canada says the economy grew 0.3 per cent in October, led by growth in manufacturing, finance and insurance, and wholesale trade.Canadian Press The Canadian Press center_img Join the conversation → Facebook Recommended For You’We were experiencing headwinds’ — Canopy Growth stock heads south on poor sales ramp-upShaw Communications is selling its stake in Corus Entertainment for $548 millionB.C. vows to appeal after top court says province can’t restrict oil shipments across its bordersProtests, legal challenges planned to block Trans Mountain expansionFINCAD Now Accepting Applications for its 2019 Women in Finance Scholarship OTTAWA — Statistics Canada says the economy grew 0.3 per cent in October, led by growth in manufacturing, finance and insurance, and wholesale trade.Economists had expected growth of 0.2 per cent, according to Thomson Reuters Eikon.The improvement followed a contraction of 0.1 per cent in September.Goods-producing industries increased 0.3 per cent after two monthly declines, while services-producing industries also grew 0.3 per cent, their strongest showing since May.In a separate report, Statistics Canada reported retail sales increased 0.3 per cent to $51.0 billion in October.Economists had expected an increase of 0.4 per cent. Featured Stories What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation Sponsored By: Share this storyCanada’s economy grows faster than expected Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Emaillast_img read more

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Audi etron Configurator Now Live Build Yours Today

Audi e-tron: Under The Skin, Battery Pack, Motors & More 22 photos Let’s take a look at what it would cost to get a top-tier 2019 Audi e-tron.Now that we’ve returned from the Audi e-tron debut in San Francisco, we figured it was time to hop on the configurator and check it out. As we previously reported, the e-tron starts at $74,800 for the very well-equipped entry-level Premium Plus model. You can choose to upgrade to the Prestige trim ($81,800), which comes with a handful of extras, like leather upholstery, a head-up display, memory seats, a Driver Assistance package, and an Air Quality package. For those who could afford it and acted immediately to be one of the first 999 customers, the $86,700 First Edition model came completely decked out, but it’s already sold out, says Audi.More Audi e-tron Coverage: Audi e-tron premiere SF Reserving an e-tron costs $1,000, which is completely refundable up until U.S. deliveries begin in the second quarter of 2019. Currently, only the base Premium Plus and Prestige trims are showing on the configurator. Audi has confirmed that the 999 First Edition models are already spoken for. Below is a screenshot of the two trims for comparison.In addition to what you see below, there are several optional packages and accessories, all of which can be added to the base model. The most expensive option is the Driver Assistance Plus package, priced at $2,850, which comes standard in the Prestige model. Other packages include Cold Weather and Towing.First, we configured the base Premium Plus trim. Checking all the boxes and choosing upgraded paint resulted in an MSRP of $81,834. Next, we chose the Prestige trim. Again, we added the upgraded paint, as well as any packages that were available. However, since the Prestige is more inclusive, there weren’t as many choices. In the end, a loaded Prestige will set you back $86,584, which is right in line with the e-tron First Edition.If you’d like to check out the Audi e-tron configurator or are ready to build and reserve your own, follow the link below. Also, we’d love to hear more about your thoughts on the e-tron in our comment section.Source: AudiAudi e-tron First Look Inside & Out At The Audi e-tron By Autogefühl 28 photos UPDATE VIDEO: Audi e-tron Debuts U.S. Price Undercuts Model X Source: Electric Vehicle News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on September 19, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News read more

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Tesla Camera As BuiltIn Dashcam Part Of V9 Update

Source: Electric Vehicle News How Many Cameras Does Tesla Autopilot 2.0 Currently Use? Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on September 20, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News New Tesla Semi Video Shows 26 Cameras, Sleeper Also Coming Dashcam Video Shows Tesla Autopilot Predict & Then Avoid Crash Worst case of Tesla hate I’ve ever seen. Truly unbelievable. Picture via Canadian Tesla Model 3 Facebook group pic.twitter.com/0TEaHYgPGP— Model 3 Owners Club (@Model3Owners) September 17, 2018 Tesla’s on-board dashcam update is just around the corner.Elon Musk announced earlier this year that there will be a new feature, enabling the use of cameras in Tesla cars for dashcam-like playback.The timeframe for the feature was moved from a “few months” in June to “soon” in September as part of the V9 over-the-air software update.Tesla and cameras However, some of the Tesla owners are disappointed and disheartened of further waiting and are considering third-party dashcams, as it would be handy to be able to record not only an accident but also vandals.Elon Musk responded the other day: “Good news on this front. Tesla engineering rallied & this will be part of V9. Going through final testing now.”Well, now we all need to prepare for the flood of videos from Tesla on-board systems.Good news on this front. Tesla engineering rallied & this will be part of V9. Going through final testing now.— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) September 17, 2018 read more

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The Future Electric Kawasaki Could Be A Ninja

first_img Curtiss Announces Pricing For New Electric Zeus Team Green could go sporty electric.Kawasaki working on an electric powertrain is not exactly news. We’ve been suspecting the Green Brand has been looking into a zero-emission engine for a few years already, with patents emerging as early as 2016. More recently, in early March, we dug out some documents about an electric engine cooling system. Now, we get a look at something we have yet to see in all these rumors and filings for electric motorcycles: Kawasaki has recently patented a detachable frame on what looks like a Ninja 300.More Bikes Evoke Introduces A New Electric Motorcycle Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on April 16, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News This one was a long time coming! In fact, the company filed for the patent in 2013. It was finally published on March 27, 2019 and gives us a peek into what Kawasaki has been working on behind the scenes. Unlike the previous patents that hinted at an electric Kawi in the works, this ones gives the bike a face—the face of the former Ninja 300. Considering that back in 2013, the smallest displacement the brand had to offer in its sport lineup was the 300 rather than the newer, more refined 400. A platform with forks that would allow for the removal of the battery pack is also described. Thanks to the detachable portion of the frame allowing for easy access to the battery, the support can simply be rolled over to the side of the bike and the forks slid in to mount or dismount the battery block.Whether 6 years later Kawasaki is still considering the frame of the Ninja 300 as a contender to receive an electric powertrain remains to be seen—the lighter frame of the 400 could present a very real advantage over the 2013 design. This could mean, however, that unlike other manufacturers opting for a more standard silhouette or an enduro model to get their electric journey started, Kawasaki is seemingly looking into something a little sportier and that this little sportier thing could get a swappable battery!Source: Free Patents Online Source: Electric Vehicle News Interestingly, the patent describes how the electric sportbike would receive a standard tubular frame with the particularity that the left portion of the frame would be equipped with a set of hinges, allowing for part of the side of the frame to pivot and open up to give free access to the batteries. Inside the frame, the document details how the motorcycle would be equipped with a lithium-ion power source, with a primary battery that can be swapped for a fully charged unit once power is depleted, and a secondary battery that can be charged. Has Kawasaki been working on a swappable battery technology all this time? Watch MX Rider Thrash This Electric Dirt Bikelast_img read more

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Amsterdam to ban ICE vehicles by 2030

first_imgSource: Electric Vehicles Magazine Amsterdam may be known for its tolerance, but air pollution from vehicles is a sin that won’t be tolerated for much longer. Dutch authorities say pollution is shortening the average life expectancy of Amsterdammers by a year, and they plan to ban cars and motorbikes running on gas or diesel from driving in the city center by 2030.“Pollution often is a silent killer and is one of thegreatest health hazards in Amsterdam,” said the councillor responsible for thecity’s traffic, Sharon Dijksma.The Clean Air Action plan will be implemented in phases.Starting next year, diesel cars that are more than 15 years old will be bannedfrom going within the A10 ring road around the Dutch capital. Smoke-belchingbuses and coaches will no longer be permitted after 2022. The ban will beextended to pleasure craft on the canals, as well as mopeds, by 2025. Alltraffic within the urban area must be emission-free by 2030.The city plans to encourage residents to go electric byoffering charging stations to every EV buyer. The city currently has some 3,000charging stations, and The Guardian’s sources estimate that it will need between16,000 and 23,000 by 2025.The Rai Association, the automotive industry’s lobby group, isnot in favor of the plan. “Many tens of thousands of families who have no moneyfor an electric car will soon be left out in the cold. That makes Amsterdam acity of the rich,” said a spokesman.Amsterdam joins numerous other European cities that aremoving to keep the most polluting vehicles out of city centers. Madrid has begunrestricting access to gas vehicles made prior to 2000 and diesel vehicles madeprior to 2006. Rome has pledged to ban diesel vehicles from the city center by2024. The Danish government has said it wants to eliminate new gas and dieselcars by 2030 and hybrids by 2035.Source: The Guardianlast_img read more

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Tesla now offers Model 3 Performance for less than 50000 by unbundling

first_imgSource: Charge Forward With the most recent price and option changes, Tesla also made some off-the-menu changes and that includes offering the Model 3 Performance for less than $50,000 by unbundling some features. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1zk7Eb8r-s&list=PL_Qf0A10763mA7Byw9ncZqxjke6Gjz0MtThe post Tesla now offers Model 3 Performance for less than $50,000 by unbundling features appeared first on Electrek.last_img read more

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Unfazed by last years putting pain García is confident of short route

first_imgThe Open Shares00 First published on Tue 15 Jul 2008 19.01 EDT Reuse this content … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Share on Facebook Sergio Garcia aims to top off a summer of Spanish sporting success by claiming The Open. Photograph: M Dunham/AP ‘The best player to never win a major’ aims to put his Carnoustie nightmare to rest, writes Paul Kelso Golf Tue 15 Jul 2008 19.01 EDT Share on WhatsApp Share on Messenger Topics Share on Pinterest Share via Email Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Since you’re here… Support The Guardian The Open 2008 Share on Twitter Share on Facebook When the first Tiger-free Open of the Woods era begins at Royal Birkdale tomorrow nobody will have a better chance of capitalising on the world No1’s absence than Sergio García. Padraig Harrington may be bringing the Claret Jug, Justin Rose the fondest memories and Phil Mickelson the most ranking points but, in a field bereft of its biggest star, it is García who has been anointed the man most likely by galleries and bookmakers alike. How he copes with the expectation promises to be one of the most diverting themes of the week, thanks largely to his agonising failure to finish what he started a year ago.Had the fates and, more specifically, García’s putter been aligned differently on the 72nd green at Carnoustie 12 months ago, the Spaniard would have arrived in Lancashire as defending champion, the unwanted accolade of best player never to win a major consigned to the Barry Burn along with Harrington’s career.Instead, having led from the opening round and having at one stage had the field four shots adrift on Sunday afternoon, García conspired to miss his best chance yet of a major. Having watched Harrington drive twice into the Burn at the 18th, García needed only par to win, but the putt he had been waiting for ever since he first picked up one of his father’s clubs aged three, a ten-footer to win the Open, slid past the cup.García appears to view that putt’s failure to track into the hole as one of the universe’s intractable mysteries, so it was forgivable that he should follow the bitterest moment of his career with perhaps the sourest press conference appearance in Open history. Yet suggestions that the damage wrought on that July evening would be permanent appear misplaced.The García who stepped out for his first practice round yesterday was as relaxed as he was bereft a year ago, relishing the attentions of the large galleries who followed him on to the links and happy to discuss the travails of last year. “It’s really not that big a deal, you know,” he said, asked for the umpteenth time to reflect on Carnoustie. “There’s a lot worse things than losing an Open in a play-off. Like I said, and like I have been saying since you guys asked me about that, there were a lot more positives coming out of that week than negatives.”Sunday night and the Monday after were a little bit tough. Other than that, you think about the week and realise you did the best you could. I felt like I hit a great putt to win the Open. Unfortunately it didn’t go in.” Therein lies the simplicity and the agony of a game that García plays better than most. A year on, and with the incentive of adding to a Spanish summer of success already marked by Luis Aragonés’ Euro 2008 champions and Rafael Nadal’s victories at Roland Garros and Wimbledon, he feels better-placed to seal the deal should the opportunity arise this week.The peerless long game that tamed Carnoustie remains intact, and will again be invaluable on a layout that will demand accuracy above all other virtues this week. What has changed is García’s confidence in his putting stroke, for so long a glaring weakness. Since March he has been working with the putting guru Stan Utley, attempting to restore to the shortest club the instinctive feel that marks the rest of his game. The results bode well for this week. García won the Players Championship at Sawgrass, fancifully known as “the fifth major”, holing crucial putts on the back nine to force a play-off that he won. That tournament was played in high winds, and García again proved himself in adverse conditions two weeks ago, producing the lowest round of a foul final day at the European Open to finish second to Ross Fisher. Arriving at his favourite major with his game in good shape, he is confident. “Probably this is my best major because I love the event,” said García. “Everything about it is great. It’s the only one we play in Europe, and I love the courses. The crowds are the best we get all year with the knowledge and respect they have not only for the game but for the players and everything around it.”I feel like my game is probably as good as it has ever been. I don’t feel complete, but I feel like I’m getting closer. I feel like I’m getting better as a player every tournament I go around. I’m learning more and more things about myself. I’ve just got to make sure I am doing the right things, that I keep believing in myself and I have a chance.” Paul Kelso Unfazed by last year’s putting pain García is confident of short route to success The Open Share via Emaillast_img read more

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Olympics Defiant Danvers leaps pain barrier and hurdles to glory

first_imgReuse this content Olympics 2008: Athletics Share via Email Tasha Danvers Tasha Danvers gave the the best performance of her fluctuating career when she held on to take bronze in the 400 metres hurdles last night. It was Britain’s third athletics medal of these Olympics and means the track and field team are now two medals away from meeting the British Olympic Association’s prediction of five.It is highly unlikely that Danvers’ name would have been on the list of prospective medal winners and she even surprised herself. “Absolutely not,” she said. “I would not have picked me. Don’t be ridiculous. I ran 57, 56 and 57 seconds.” But here she produced the fastest run of her life to finish third in 53.84sec behind Melanie Walker of Jamaica, who won in an Olympic record of 52.64 with the American Sheena Tosta second in 53.70.”I am elated to get this medal,” said Danvers, who leapt in the air when the result was confirmed, stopped and then repeated the celebration act. “It has been easily one of the worst seasons of my life and one of the best seasons at the same time. “My blood-cell count was low and that was why I was running so crappy. I was glad just to be picked, to be honest. I’ve had so many problems.”Danvers’ form was so bad that she did not even win the Olympic trials, finishing second to the teenager Perri Shakes-Drayton. But she had the A standard and was given the nod ahead of the 19-year-old, who had run only the B mark.”If I was on the outside looking in I probably would have said I shouldn’t be selected,” said Danvers. “But the things people don’t know behind the scenes are the things that the selectors know. They knew what the doctors were seeing and they how long it would take.”Having missed the last Olympic Games because she was pregnant, Danvers, who is coached by her American husband Darrell Smith, returned to win silver at the Commonwealth Games in Melbourne in 2006. But the Olympics are another level.”I am so happy to be on the podium,” the 30-year-old said. “It means everything to me. The moral of the story is never give up. It’s not always rosy and that’s the nature of athletics.”Danvers looked to be fading as the race reached the home turn, but she then found an extra ounce of speed and was never in danger of losing third place. She is the first British woman to win an Olympic 400m hurdles medal since Sally Gunnell’s gold in Barcelona in 1992.Mo Farah, though, was struggling to deal with not reaching the final of the 5,000m. The Briton was sixth in his heat in 13min 50.95sec behind Kenya’s Edwin Cheruiyot Soi in 13:46.41 and failed to make it as one of the quickest losers. “The Olympics comes around only once every four years so it is not an easy one to take,” said Farah. “You want to play all your cards at the Olympics but it didn’t happen. I am capable of doing it but you can’t just say that, you have to do it. It is a hard one to take.” Emily Freeman was knocked out in the semi-finals of the 200m, finishing seventh in her race in 22.83 as American favourite Allyson Felix won in 22.33. Michael Rimmer, who has had food poisoning, won his first-round heat of the 800m. “I felt quite rough,” he admitted. … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Share on Pinterest Wed 20 Aug 2008 19.01 EDT 2008 British Olympic medals Since you’re here… Athletics Britain’s Tasha Danvers celebrates winning bronze in the women’s 400m hurdles. Photograph: Mark J Terrill/AP Topics 2008 GB Olympic bronze This article is more than 10 years old First published on Wed 20 Aug 2008 19.01 EDT Olympics: Defiant Danvers leaps pain barrier and hurdles to glory Read more Share on Facebook This article is more than 10 years old · Briton follows in Gunnell’s footsteps to win medal· Gutsy run ends in ecstasy after year of agony news The Recap: sign up for the best of the Guardian’s sport coverage Michael Phillips at the Bird’s Nest Stadium Share on Twitter Olympics 2008 Share on WhatsApp Share on Twitter Shares00 Share on Facebook Share via Email Share on LinkedIn Support The Guardian British Olympic team 2008 Share on Messenger Olympics 2008last_img read more

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Students Can Participate in Mock Election Before TuesdayChelan and Douglas County On

first_imgSecretary of State Kim Wyman announced Wednesday that the annual Student Mock Election is open from now until Nov. 6. The Mock Election is a non-partisan educational event that teaches children and teenagers how to become informed voters. Students vote on real ballot measures and real candidates. In a new feature this year, students will vote on paper ballots just like adult voters throughout Washington. Ballots are available for download and printing at Vote.wa.gov/MockElection. Other free resources available online include “I Voted” stickers to be ordered by Oct. 30, a print-friendly Voter’s Pamphlet and the curriculum book Teaching Elections in Washington State. The lessons in the book are for grades K–12, meet state and common core standards, and satisfy the civics coursework required for graduation. Classroom Based Assessments are included with each lesson. “Introducing students to the value of civic participation at a young age is a critical step to helping grow the next generation of informed and involved citizens,” Secretary Wyman said. “Research tells us that people who pick up the habit of voting early in life become lifelong voters. The Mock Election is a perfect way to start.” To learn more and download participation materials, visit the 2018 Mock Election resources page at the Office of the Secretary of State website.last_img read more

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A Year Reimagined

first_imgby, Laura Beck, The Eden AlternativeTweetShareShareEmail0 SharesPhoto by Maggie GustafsonI received an invitation to be inspired this New Year’s Eve and Day, and I’m so delighted that I accepted it.  Living in Ithaca, NY, I seized the chance to attend First Fest, sponsored by the Life Reimagined Institute at AARP.  Envisioned by Bill and Jude Thomas, First Fest is a love letter to creative expression and community spirit. This year’s two-day event offered a fresh twist on typical New Year’s fare.  A celebration of local music, dance, poetry, and art, First Fest invited me to engage my senses, rather than over-indulge them.But there was something deeper I walked away with that I didn’t expect… a sense of the spiral nature of time and the unique hand we each offer in creating the present moment. Throughout the event, I couldn’t help but feel that, yes, here we are again, at this place on the wheel of the year, yet it’s a richer, wiser version of itself with more layers and nuance.  This should be no surprise, coming from the Thomases, who can always be counted on to cleverly remind us that life – at any age, at any time – is an ever-evolving work of art, full of ongoing growth and possibility.It began New Year’s Eve at Corks and More, a local wine tasting lounge, with a performance of music from 1914, newly arranged for 2014 by musician Nate Silas Richardson and a group of premier local artists.  The lush harmonies were, at moments, so timeless, that when I closed my eyes, setting and space were irrelevant. It was something older and beautiful, made even more resonant by the now.  The play on time continued New Year’s Day at the Museum of the Earth with “Arts in Harmony,” a First Fest feast for the senses.Beneath a massive right whale skeleton (itself, a work of art), attendees noshed on locally-inspired appetizers amidst fossils from the Devonian period.  Improvisational music blended with recorded sounds of the local, natural world while abstract photography, capturing the textures and shapes of our Finger Lakes Region, glided across the wall.  Sights and sounds of different seasons filled the room, blending time and texture, mosaic-like.  This became the backdrop for three poet laureates and a duet of dancers dressed in white, who became one with the art projected behind them, bringing it to life in three dimensions.  I was spellbound.  These artists, all of different ages, were mostly familiar to me, but their work layered in this deeply moving way became something, well, reimagined.  I left there wanting to share my own gifts in new ways, to see how they might become a part of something bigger than me… hence, the metaphor.As culture changers, the art of creating a caring community is like fine art.  We are invited to shape and re-shape culture in everything we do, whether it involves our own inner world or the systems that we influence. This doesn’t mean throwing out what’s come before, but rather building on its existing strengths and beauty to create something richer that honors the wisdom of time.  The opportunity to grow, become, and transform is ever present… we simply have to take it.  No more hiding… it’s time to come out, try something new, and (gasp) maybe even shine! And as we each have powerful gifts to share – no matter who we are or how old we are – together we are even stronger and more dazzling.  In the First Fest program notes, a quote from Bill Thomas says, “The right to ‘reimagine’ our lives, our work, and our communities belongs to us all.”  What more is there to say?  Heed the call.  Make this year count.Related PostsRethinking Life ReimaginedToday, Dr. Bill Thomas called me up and asked me a relatively straightforward question: do I think AARP’s Life Reimagined is having an impact on the lives of ChangingAging’s audience?Reimagine Your New YearIf the Life Reimagined movement is going to be about the conscious reclamation of new beginnings, it would seem logical that our movement ought to “reimagine” the American secular holiday that resonates most fully with “fresh starts.” Yeah, that’s right — we are plotting to take over New Years.Reimagine Life After AdulthoodOne of the primary goals of ChangingAging is to explore life after adulthood so we’re very interested in tools and resources that could help our readers do this. As we say right in our masthead, we believe aging is a core human strength, rich in developmental potential and growth. AARP’s…TweetShareShareEmail0 SharesTags: ChangingAging Dr Bill Thomas events Life Reimagined New Year’s novellast_img read more

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Researchers detect presence of IgE antibodies after kidney transplantation

first_imgJul 17 2018Many donor kidneys that are transplanted are rejected by the recipient within ten years after transplantation. One reason for this are immunoglobulin G antibodies (IgG), which act against human leukocyte antigens (HLA), a tissue characteristic on transplants, and cause rejection. As a result, IgG antibodies are biomarkers for an increased risk of later graft loss. Researchers at the Department of Surgery in cooperation with the Center for Pathophysiology, Infectiology and Immunology and the Division of Nephrology at MedUni Vienna, were able to show that IgE antibodies, which have previously been only known to cause allergic reactions, also occur after kidney transplantation. “This new finding could open up completely new diagnostic options,” says transplantation immunologist Thomas Wekerle. “In the future we might be able to better assess the risk of subsequent rejections with the help of these antibodies, which are rather untypical in transplantation. For the first time, the Viennese researchers have succeeded in detecting IgE antibodies after kidney transplantation. Wekerle: “IgE is a very special antibody and – compared to IgG, for example – difficult to measure.”Related StoriesCommon metric may not accurately assess kidney function of Indian patientsLow dose of endotoxin could have protective effect on men at risk of acute kidney injuryChronic kidney disease patients are excluded from clinical trialsIgE antibodies are usually known for their important role in the development of allergies. For example, immunoglobulins E are directed against otherwise harmless antigens such as pollen, which can trigger an allergic reaction.”In transplantation a different type of IgE antibody occurs which targets tissue characteristics of the donor kidney,” said Andreas Farkas, the first author of the study he conducted during his PhD studies at MedUni Vienna. This was also clearly shown in comparison with the “allergy IgE”. “IgEs cause local inflammation and, this is our current hypothesis, could be potentially involved in the subsequent rejection of the organ together with the IgG antibodies.”This could open up completely new therapeutic options and preventive measures. While it has not yet been possible to achieve long-term immunotolerance of IgG antibodies after transplantation, Rudolf Valenta and his team from the Department of Pathophysiology and Allergy Research at MedUni Vienna were able to show in a study published last year that there is a way of removing IgE antibodies from the blood.The “IgEnio” column was developed for this purpose. With the help of this specific disposable adsorber for the treatment of IgE-induced diseases, the IgE level in the blood plasma is reduced by passing the blood of the affected person through a “column” in which the IgE antibodies adhere – namely by means of sepharose particles which are occupied with IgE capture proteins. These bind the IgE in the column and practically suck it off as it flows through during “blood washing”. If follow-up studies already in progress show that IgE is involved in the rejection, it would also be conceivable to use this therapeutic removal of IgE in transplant patients. Source:https://www.meduniwien.ac.at/web/en/about-us/news/detailsite/2018/news-im-juli-2018/ige-antibodies-detected-for-the-first-time-after-kidney-transplantation/last_img read more

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Compounds in monster radish could potentially prevent heart disease and stroke

first_img Source:https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/pressroom/presspacs/2018/acs-presspac-august-8-2018/compounds-in-monster-radish-could-help-tame-cardiovascular-disease.html Aug 9 2018Step aside carrots, onions and broccoli. The newest heart-healthy vegetable could be a gigantic, record-setting radish. In a study appearing in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that compounds found in the Sakurajima Daikon, or “monster,” radish could help protect coronary blood vessels and potentially prevent heart disease and stroke. The finding could lead to the discovery of similar substances in other vegetables and perhaps lead to new drug treatments.Related StoriesRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaMathematical model helps quantify metastatic cell behaviorDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustGrown for centuries in Japan, the Sakurajima Daikon is one of the Earth’s most massive vegetables. In 2003, the Guinness Book of World Records certified a Sakurajima weighing nearly 69 pounds as the world’s heaviest radish. Radishes are good sources of antioxidants and reportedly can reduce high blood pressure and the threat of clots, a pair of risk factors for heart attack and stroke. But to date, no studies have directly compared the heart-health benefits of the Sakurajima Daikon to other radishes. To address this knowledge gap, Katsuko Kajiya and colleagues sought to find out what effects this radish would have on nitric oxide production, a key regulator of coronary blood vessel function, and to determine its underlying mechanisms.The researchers exposed human and pig vascular endothelial cells to extracts from Sakurajima Daikon and smaller radishes. Using fluorescence microscopy and other analytical techniques, the research team found the Sakurajima Daikon radish induced more nitric oxide production in these vascular cells than a smaller Japanese radish. They also identified trigonelline, a plant hormone, as the active component in Sakurajima Daikon that appears to promote a cascade of changes in coronary blood vessels resulting improved nitric oxide production.last_img read more

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ScienceShot Why the Zebra Has Its Stripes

Zebras’ bold striped patterns have puzzled scientists for nearly 150 years. Researchers have offered a lengthy list of possible explanations, from confusing predators by creating a distracting dazzle when a herd gallops away, to helping the animals avoid biting flies. Support for the dazzler hypothesis comes from computer tests using people, who have trouble tracking striped, moving objects on a computer; while other studies have shown that the flies prefer to land on uniformly colored, not striped, surfaces. Now, a team of scientists reports online today in Nature Communications that it has tested these hypotheses—as well as suggestions that the stripes might cool zebras down or make them more attractive to mates—to see which one makes the most ecological sense. The winner: those pesky, blood-sucking, disease-carrying (such as parasitic trypanosomiasis) biting flies. The team discovered that the ranges of the horse fly and tsetse fly species and the three most distinctively striped zebra species (Equus burchelli, E. zebra, and E. grevyi) overlap to a remarkable degree. They did not find a similar ecological match for any of the other hypotheses, not even those involving predators. Instead, the researchers argue that biting flies are the most likely reason that zebras, such as those shown above grazing in Tanzania’s Katavi National Park, evolved their distinctive ornamentation. The insects, they note, harass the equids almost year-round, and are known to torment domesticated horses in these areas. The zebras’ black-and-white patterns, which others have shown seem to interfere with the flies’ vision, at least give them a bit of a break. Why equids are so susceptible to the flies’ attacks remains mysterious, but, as the researchers found, the zebras’ short coats may make them particularly vulnerable, and the diseases the flies carry are often fatal.See more ScienceShots. read more

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Is There A Serial Killer In Dominican Republic

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisMoreShare to EmailEmailEmail To be sure, aside from the eerie pattern, there have been no other indications that there was a serial killer on the loose in the Dominican Republic and officials have refrained from suggesting as much. Those similarities are exactly what seems to have fueled the social media theory that the deaths in the Dominican Republic were the work of a serial killer. And while that theory has not been confirmed, nor even addressed, by officials, the fact that the six people who died each drank from their resort’s hotel room minibar before dying was hard to ignore. One of the scenes of the potential crimes has been at the Grand Bahia Principe in La Romana, where at least three of the deaths took place. One traveler to the hotel resort in October told the New York Post she suspected that something evil was at play. A Complete, Recent Timeline Of Disaster For Americans Visiting The Dominican Republic Sooooo does the #DominicanRepublic have a serial killer aiming for tourists or is the liquor industry knocking them off so the hotels are forced to stock the mini bars with mini individual bottles (airline size).— Samantha (@samantha3050) June 13, 2019Dozens of other American tourists across the island nation who survived their trips to the popular vacation destination also complained of severe sicknesses. Could someone be intentionally poisoning the contents of hotel room minibars? While the supposition seemed far-fetched, it could not be ruled out as investigators kept searching for answers. A serial killer who apparently works at a fairly posh resort in the Dominican Republic is targeting Americans.— Peggy Wheeler (@PeggyAWheeler) June 12, 2019Bahia Principe Hotels & Resorts consequently went on damage control and issued a brief statement denying any culpability and making reference to “false statements” associated with what it called “two unfortunate events.” The statement also threatened legal action, though it was not clear who or what could be targeted with a lawsuit.SEE ALSO:Cops Change Their Story As Officer Who Pulled Gun On Innocent Mentally Disabled Black Child Keeps His JobWho is Brandon Webber? Everything To Know About The Black Man Killed By U.S. Marshals In Memphis The Duality Of The Role Fear Plays In ‘The Talk’ As investigators worked to determine how so many American tourists have turned up dead in recent months in the Dominican Republic, social media sleuths have been pretty consistent and adamant about what they say has caused the string of deaths and illnesses. The FBI has even joined in the investigation of the deaths that share so many similarities. Most likely cause is poisoning via mini-bar drinks with organophosphate pesticide. Autopsy result of pulmonary edema and one victim’s family member recollection of a bad odor are typical findings. There is a serial killer in the #DominicanRepublic https://t.co/b5Qgacnd4U— pro dreamer (@prodreamer1) June 13, 2019 If no one has said it yet I willIt appears that there is a serial killer Loose in the #DominicanRepublic— unclecharlie2112 (@unclecharlie211) June 13, 2019While the American embassy in the Dominican Republic asked “everyone to be patient while these investigations run their course,” the families of Edward Nathaniel Holmes and Cynthia Ann Day, a Black couple engaged to be married who were found dead in their Grand Bahia Principe hotel room late last month, plan to have their own toxicology tests and autopsies conducted independently of Dominican authorities.center_img Is there a serial killer in the Dominican Republic?— More Lesley (@MoreLesley) June 13, 2019 ‘The Talk’ 101 Sorry ppl, but there’s a serial killer working in the #DominicanRepublic. After two recent visits there, I’m done with the DR. God help them and their #tourism business— Kevin (@DebtNationUSA) June 13, 2019“I’ve heard all these different theories and the most that make sense to me would be a disgruntled employee or a serial killer,” Awilda Montes, who “began vomiting blood after drinking soda from her minibar” at the same hotel, said recently. “I’m doing preparations for my daughter’s baby shower and yesterday she turned to me and said, ‘Just to think you could be gone, you could have missed all of this.’” Dominican Republic Caribbean beach full of tourists More By NewsOne Staff Tin Foil Take Time: I’m gonna go ahead and say it, there is either a serial killer in the Dominican Republic, or they have a group of locals or some sort of cult that are coordinating murders on Americans.— Swig (@OldRowSwig) June 13, 2019There has also not been a travel ban announced by the State Department, something that would be sure to be in place should it be determined that suspicions of a serial killer had any credence. The New York Post reported that nearly 70 tourists in the Dominican Republic said they got violently sick on their trips since March. There were only 10 for all of 2018. I bet there’s a serial killer in the Dominican Republic targeting tourists. pic.twitter.com/NwIirUIWFP— Kaede 金縛り楓 (@intriKaede) June 13, 2019 How The News Cycle Dictates ‘The Talk’ Parents Have With Their Kidslast_img read more

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BBC Host Fired After Comment About Royal Baby

first_img Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist BBC just fired the radio show host who posted this racist ugliness. Danny Baker deleted the tweet, then offered a half ass apology, claiming he didn’t know it was racist. pic.twitter.com/kgWXGW9bNJ— Shaun King (@shaunking) May 9, 2019According to CNN, BBC released the following statement, “This was a serious error of judgment and goes against the values we as a station aim to embody. Danny’s a brilliant broadcaster but will no longer be presenting a weekly show with us.”Baker has been shedding white tears on social media. He wrote on Twitter, “Would have used same stupid pic for any other Royal birth or Boris Johnson kid or even one of my own. It’s a funny image. (Though not of course in that context.) Enormous mistake, for sure. Grotesque. Anyway, here’s to ya Archie, Sorry mate.” Philadelphia Police Arrest Of Two Black Men In Starbucks, Prompts Apology From Company's CEO A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ The call to fire me from @bbc5live was a masterclass of pompous faux-gravity. Took a tone that said I actually meant that ridiculous tweet and the BBC must uphold blah blah blah. Literally threw me under the bus. Could hear the suits knees knocking. #Fuckem— Danny Baker (@prodnose) May 9, 2019Even people in his own comments have been slamming him. One user wrote, “Just so disappointed in you, having watched /listened to you since the 6 O’Clock show. This is the 4th ‘royal baby circus’ – not the first. Perhaps ask yourself if your subconscious knew exactly what you were doing? Oh and that ‘apology’ – not good.”Again, this is nothing new for Meghan and Harry. Shortly after their relationship went public in November of 2016, she was attacked and Harry released an epic statement that read in part, “The past week has seen a line crossed. His girlfriend, Meghan Markle, has been subject to a wave of abuse and harassment. Some of this has been very public – the smear on the front page of a national newspaper; the racial undertones of comment pieces; and the outright sexism and racism of social media trolls and web article comments.”The statement continued, “Some of it has been hidden from the public – the nightly legal battles to keep defamatory stories out of papers; her mother having to struggle past photographers in order to get to her front door; the attempts of reporters and photographers to gain illegal entry to her home and the calls to police that followed; the substantial bribes offered by papers to her ex-boyfriend; the bombardment of nearly every friend, co-worker, and loved one in her life.” Ever since Meghan Markle and Prince Harry went public, they have had to deal with disgusting racism from all over the world, but especially from the British. Now, the BBC has fired a radio host who comparing their newborn royal baby to a chimpanzee.See Also: UK Royal Wears Blackface Brooch, Offers Lame Apology To Meghan MarkleDanny Baker posted a tweet that showed a  photo of a white man and a Black woman holding hands with a chimp in a suit and a top hat. The caption read, “Royal baby leaves hospital.” See the disgusting tweet that has since been deleted. More By NewsOne Staffcenter_img BBC , Meghan Markle , prince harry Activists Protest Racial Profiling, Arrests Of Black People In Starbucks The statement also read, “This is not a game – it is her life and his.”Congrats to Prince Harry and Meghan Markle on their healthy baby boy Archie.SEE ALSO:Here’s Why NewsOne Won’t Be Covering One Iota Of The Royal WeddingWhite House Spokeswoman Called ‘Uncle Tom’ At Correspondents’ DinnerBlack Police Officer Shot And Killed In His Home Now Sky at the door.Would have used same stupid pic for any other Royal birth or Boris Johnson kid or even one of my own. It’s a funny image. (Though not of course in that context.) Enormous mistake, for sure. Grotesque.Anyway, here’s to ya Archie, Sorry mate.#Occam #Razor— Danny Baker (@prodnose) May 9, 2019He also babbled, “The call to fire me from @bbc5live was a masterclass of pompous faux-gravity. Took a tone that said I actually meant that ridiculous tweet and the BBC must uphold blah blah blah. Literally threw me under the bus. Could hear the suits knees knocking. #Fuckem” Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Familylast_img read more

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